Are U.S. whites ‘hunkering down’ in racially-diverse cities and neighborhoods?
Les blancs américains préfèrent-ils le “vivre entre soi” ?

Daniel T. Lichter, Domenico Parisi, Michael C. Taquino
U.S.A. white and black people

America’s new racial diversity has upended conventional empirical approaches to residential segregation based on simple binary notions of the color line: white–black, white–nonwhite, or black–nonblack. Multiculturalism, pluralism, and racial hierarchy are now expressed in the new language of majority-minority, super diversity (i.e., heightened diversity within minority or immigrant populations), and global neighborhoods (i.e., those with
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Migration reduces climate risk for many but not for all
La migration réduit le risque climatique (mais pas pour tous)

Martina Grecequet, Jessica Hellmann
City desert: migration reduces climate risk

As the consequences of climate change accumulate, many experts expect to see migration away from the world’s most impacted regions as people seek a climate and an economy that better sustains human life. This will add to migratory movements caused by other more traditional reasons: civil wars, natural disasters or the search for better work
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Immigrant receptivity and local area unemployment in the U.S.
Chômage et perception des immigrés à l’échelle locale aux États-Unis

Gordon F. De Jong, Deborah R. Graefe, Chris Galvan, Stephanie Howe Hasanali
Niussp_chomage3

Recent political events in many countries have made it clear that the receptivity of immigrants by destination area citizens is a contentious issue. Natives in arrival countries have demonstrated both hostile and welcoming attitudes and behavior, ranging from anti-immigrant attacks and votes in elections, to spontaneous and organized food and housing support for immigrants. Cross-national
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Children born to a lone mother and their well-being in the UK
Le bien-être des enfants de mères célibataires au Royaume-Uni

Elena Mariani, Alice Goisis
lone mother with his children

Numerous studies have looked at the relationship between family structure and child well-being. Overall, the evidence suggests that children who grow up in a household with two married biological parents, on average, do better than those growing up with a single mother (Bernardi and Boertien 2017; Sigle-Rushton and McLanahan 2014; McLanahan et al. 2013). However,
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Sharing routine housework and desire for more children in East Asia
Le partage des tâches ménagères et le désir d’enfants en Asie de l’Est

Man-Yee Kan, Ekaterina Hertog
woman doing routine housework

Low fertility levels have become a typical characteristic of industrialised countries where two distinct patterns are observed. A number of countries, especially in southern Europe and East Asia, have persistently low fertility levels. Another group of countries, such as Sweden and Finland, after a period of fluctuation, have managed to achieve fertility close to replacement
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Fertility in the time of economic crisis
La fécondité aux temps de la crise économique

Ludovica Comolli
Fertility in the time of economic crisis - empty cradles

When uncertain about the stability of their present or future earnings or jobs, individuals postpone life-changing decisions. Scientific research confirms conventional wisdom and shows that the Great Recession that started in 2008 had a paralyzing effect on childbearing in most western economies. As illustrated in Figure 1, after a period of growing fertility at the
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Persistent high fertility in rural Africa
Persistance d’une fécondité élevée en milieu rural africain

Michel Garenne
fertility in rural Africa: group of boys

The fertility transition, defined as a change from high and natural fertility (in a range of five to nine children per woman) to low and controlled fertility (down to two children per woman or less) started in France in the 18th century, and spread during the 19th century to other European populations, including expatriate populations
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Majority to minority: the declining U.S. white population
Quand la majorité devient minorité : le cas des blancs aux Etats-Unis

Dudley L. Poston jr., Rogelio Sáenz
minority. two young black boys in new york

In this essay we document the demography of the decline of the white population in the United States, a country with a long history of white supremacy.
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