Children born to a lone mother and their well-being in the UK
Le bien-être des enfants de mères célibataires au Royaume-Uni

Elena Mariani, Alice Goisis
lone mother with his children

Numerous studies have looked at the relationship between family structure and child well-being. Overall, the evidence suggests that children who grow up in a household with two married biological parents, on average, do better than those growing up with a single mother (Bernardi and Boertien 2017; Sigle-Rushton and McLanahan 2014; McLanahan et al. 2013). However,
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Sharing routine housework and desire for more children in East Asia
Le partage des tâches ménagères et le désir d’enfants en Asie de l’Est

Man-Yee Kan, Ekaterina Hertog
woman doing routine housework

Low fertility levels have become a typical characteristic of industrialised countries where two distinct patterns are observed. A number of countries, especially in southern Europe and East Asia, have persistently low fertility levels. Another group of countries, such as Sweden and Finland, after a period of fluctuation, have managed to achieve fertility close to replacement
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Fertility in the time of economic crisis
La fécondité aux temps de la crise économique

Ludovica Comolli
Fertility in the time of economic crisis - empty cradles

When uncertain about the stability of their present or future earnings or jobs, individuals postpone life-changing decisions. Scientific research confirms conventional wisdom and shows that the Great Recession that started in 2008 had a paralyzing effect on childbearing in most western economies. As illustrated in Figure 1, after a period of growing fertility at the
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Persistent high fertility in rural Africa
Persistance d’une fécondité élevée en milieu rural africain

Michel Garenne
fertility in rural Africa: group of boys

The fertility transition, defined as a change from high and natural fertility (in a range of five to nine children per woman) to low and controlled fertility (down to two children per woman or less) started in France in the 18th century, and spread during the 19th century to other European populations, including expatriate populations
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Majority to minority: the declining U.S. white population
Quand la majorité devient minorité : le cas des blancs aux Etats-Unis

Dudley L. Poston jr., Rogelio Sáenz
minority. two young black boys in new york

In this essay we document the demography of the decline of the white population in the United States, a country with a long history of white supremacy.
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Internal migration drives population change in Asia
Migration interne et changement démographique en Asie

Gavin Jones
internal migration, picture o people walkingpeople walking

The three giants of Asia – China, India and Indonesia – make up 40% of the world’s population and 49% of the population of countries defined by the United Nations as developing.  
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Surrogacy: a multi-faceted phenomenon
La gestation pour autrui: une réalité complexe et plurielle

Virginie Rozée, Laurent Toulemon
surrogacy: pregnent woman

Although still rare among assisted reproductive technologies (ART)¹, surrogacy is a very controversial subject: some consider it as a new way to overcome infertility,
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The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion
Quatre milliards de personnes en plus. Mais différentes

David Lam
image of people. next 4 billion people

When the world population reached 7 billion in 2011, it marked the amazing addition of 4 billion people in just over 50 years, the world having attained the 3 billion milestone in 1960.
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