Population density interacts with sanitation to predict child health
Densité de population, équipements sanitaires et santé des enfants

Diane Coffey, Payal Hathi
Population density: child in India

Studies on child health in developing countries often find that children are healthier in urban areas than in rural areas. There are many reasons for this disparity. People in urban areas tend to be richer and better educated. Further, more densely populated places are more likely to have easier access to health services that matter
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Teenage immigrants fare worse than younger immigrants in Norway
Les migrants adolescents réussissent moins bien que les migrants plus jeunes en Norvège

Are Skeie Hermansen
Noeway_art

Immigration during childhood represents an important turning point for future developmental trajectories, and the timing of this event (i.e., age at arrival) has an impact on later-life educational success and economic opportunities (Hermansen, 2017). About 15 percent of the world’s migrants are under the age of 20. That is almost 37 million people according to
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Past fertility and living alone in later life in Spain
La fécondité et le risque de vivre seule au grand âge en Espagne

David S. Reher, Miguel Requena
woman in later life in Spain

The prevalence of living alone during later life varies widely across developed countries but everywhere its recent growth has been remarkable, even in societies with traditionally strong family ties. Fertility has been very low in these countries for decades now, especially in the eastern and southern fringes of Europe, and there are simultaneous increases in
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Increasing residential age segregation in Britain
Augmentation de la ségrégation résidentielle selon l’âge en Grande-Bretagne

Albert Sabater, Elspeth Graham, Nissa Finney
residential age segregation

The age differentiation of neighbourhoods is often viewed as natural, inevitable or unproblematic, with the view of particular places as appropriate for some age groups while others are not. Increases over the past century in the “chronolization” of life – the use of age to determine what activities and spaces individuals will engage or live
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First birth postponement and fertility in Europe
Report des premières naissances et fécondité en Europe

Hippolyte d’Albis, Angela Greulich, Gregory Ponthière
niussp_motherhood_articolo

The postponement of first childbirth has been occurring in most European countries for some decades now. In public and media discussion, delayed childbearing is often rather glibly associated with the fact that more women are going to university and getting jobs, and that they consequently want fewer children. Researchers find that for women born in
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How comparable are self-reported health data on the older population in Europe?
L’état de santé perçu des personnes âgées en Europe. Les données sont-elles comparables ?

Katherine Keenan, Else Foverskov, Emily Grundy
Niussp_oggi3

Europe has large projected increases in the proportion of older people in the population (United Nations 2013). Therefore, high quality, representative longitudinal data on the older European population are essential to develop our understanding of age-related changes in socio-demographic circumstances, health, resources and activity patterns. The SHARE and GGS surveys Two notable sources of large
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The demography of Trump’s wall
Le mur de Trump et ses conséquences démographiques

Dudley L. Poston jr., Peter A. Morrison
Schermata-2017-03-30-alle-15.58.50

A major feature of the presidential campaign of Donald Trump was his pledge to build a wall on the southern border of the United States that would stop once and forever the “illegal” migration of Mexicans and others from Central America. He told his supporters that Mexico would pay for the wall. But he has
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The economic and fiscal impact of immigration in the US
L’impact économique et fiscal de l’immigration aux États-Unis

Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie
ImmigrationUsa_niussp

More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, immigrants and their children comprise almost one in four Americans. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts
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