Marriage is useless (for wages)
Se marier est inutile (pour gagner plus)

Alexandra Killewald, Ian Lundberg
marriage

On average, in the United States, men earn more per hour when married than when single, even after adjusting for differences such as age and education. However, despite the suggestive evidence that marriage may exert a causal effect on men’s wages, we argue that closer inspection reveals little evidence of such a link. Why might
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Recent fertility changes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Évolution récente de la fécondité en République démocratique du Congo

David Shapiro, Basile O. Tambashe
Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the third most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of the countries with the highest fertility in the world, at 6.6 children per woman in the country’s most recent Demographic and Health Survey (MPSMRM et al 2014). It is also one of the very few countries
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ISIS genocide of the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar, Iraq
Le génocide par Daech de la minorité religieuse Yazidi de Sinjar, en Irak

Valeria Cetorelli, Isaac Sasson, Nazar Shabila, Gilbert Burnham
profughi_art

A UN Independent International Commission of Inquiry has determined that ISIS acts against the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar constitute a case of ongoing genocide (OHCR 2016). While ISIS’s intent to destroy the Yazidi community has been ascertained, the extent of killings and kidnappings of Yazidis and the demographics of those targeted have long remained
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Non-cohabiting relationships: mainly a transitional situation
Le couple à distance: une situation avant tout transitoire

Arnaud Régnier-Loilier
articolo_art

Formerly synonymous with marriage, cohabitation has become a lasting form of union in France and this country is now among those where the practice is most widespread (Prioux 2009). Moreover, the annual number of PACS¹ is gradually catching up with the number of marriages (187,000 PACS and 226,000 marriages in 2015). At the same time,
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Population density interacts with sanitation to predict child health
Densité de population, équipements sanitaires et santé des enfants

Diane Coffey, Payal Hathi
Population density: child in India

Studies on child health in developing countries often find that children are healthier in urban areas than in rural areas. There are many reasons for this disparity. People in urban areas tend to be richer and better educated. Further, more densely populated places are more likely to have easier access to health services that matter
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Teenage immigrants fare worse than younger immigrants in Norway
Les migrants adolescents réussissent moins bien que les migrants plus jeunes en Norvège

Are Skeie Hermansen
Noeway_art

Immigration during childhood represents an important turning point for future developmental trajectories, and the timing of this event (i.e., age at arrival) has an impact on later-life educational success and economic opportunities (Hermansen, 2017). About 15 percent of the world’s migrants are under the age of 20. That is almost 37 million people according to
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Past fertility and living alone in later life in Spain
La fécondité et le risque de vivre seule au grand âge en Espagne

David S. Reher, Miguel Requena
woman in later life in Spain

The prevalence of living alone during later life varies widely across developed countries but everywhere its recent growth has been remarkable, even in societies with traditionally strong family ties. Fertility has been very low in these countries for decades now, especially in the eastern and southern fringes of Europe, and there are simultaneous increases in
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Increasing residential age segregation in Britain
Augmentation de la ségrégation résidentielle selon l’âge en Grande-Bretagne

Albert Sabater, Elspeth Graham, Nissa Finney
residential age segregation

The age differentiation of neighbourhoods is often viewed as natural, inevitable or unproblematic, with the view of particular places as appropriate for some age groups while others are not. Increases over the past century in the “chronolization” of life – the use of age to determine what activities and spaces individuals will engage or live
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