Will international adoption be replaced by surrogacy?
La gestation pour autrui va-t-elle remplacer l’adoption internationale?

Jean-François Mignot
Juno_niussp2

Until the 1960s and 1970s, infecund (sterile) Western couples who desired a child but could not have one of their own could usually adopt a child in their home country. However, as contraception developed and induced abortion became legal in the West, fewer and fewer children were unwanted and abandoned by their birth parents and
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Does birth spacing matter for long-term outcomes?
Intervalles intergénésiques: quelles conséquences sur le devenir des enfants?

Kieron Barclay
niussp_13marzo2

In a study recently published in the journal Demography, my co-author Martin Kolk and I examined whether the length of spacing between births is related to long-term cognitive, educational, and socioeconomic outcomes (Open Access paper available here).
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Marriage then the baby carriage?
Mariage et fécondité dans les pays développés d’aujourd’hui

Jennifer A. Holland
Niussp_marriage2

The mid-20th-century was a Golden Age of marriage in Europe and the United States. People married early, usually in their early-to-mid-20s, and often, with over 90% of people marrying at least once in most countries (Sobotka & Toulemon 2008). Fast forward to the early 21st century: fewer people marry and those who do wait longer,
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Eradicating induced abortion? Lessons from 20th Century France
Empêcher l’avortement? L’histoire française du XXe siècle

Fabrice Cahen
avortement

In France, for two decades – roughly from the late 1930s to the late 1950s – induced abortion was not only prohibited, it was well and truly the target of a war (Cahen, 2016). What can 21st century citizens learn from this historical episode? From moral rejection to public policies The moral perception of induced
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Childlessness in Europe
Rester sans enfants en Europe

Michaela Kreyenfeld
culle-vuote2

High levels of childlessness may seem typical of individualized modern societies. However, the phenomenon has been widespread throughout human history. From the Early Modern Period, marriage and childbearing were strictly regulated by law and custom.
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Assimilation and birth outcomes of Hispanics in the US
Mariages mixtes et issue des grossesses des Hispaniques aux États Unis

Osea Giuntella
Hispanic2

The immigrant health effect is a well-known public health fact observed in many advanced economies. Immigrants tend to be healthier than natives, though their health advantage erodes over time.
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Vital registration in Africa: when will it be complete?
À quand un état civil exhaustif en Afrique?

Michel Garenne, Pierre Cantrelle
VItalregistration2

Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CR/VS) is an essential administrative system in modern societies. The registration of births and deaths defines a number of basic rights and duties, and is compulsory for the rule of law, legal identity, social security systems and many other aspects of social life. The publication and analysis of vital statistics
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Health effects of working beyond State Pension Age in England
Travailler après l’âge légal de la retraite: effets sur la santé en Angleterre

Giorgio Di Gessa, Laurie M Corna, Loretta Platts, Diana Worts, Peggy McDonough, Amanda Sacker, Debora Price, Karen Glaser
oldpeoleworking2_niussp

Paid work in adulthood is generally considered beneficial for physical and psychological health and well-being (Woodell and Burton 2006) but its effects at older ages are unclear.
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