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  • EDITORIAL COMMITTEE
    • Alaka BasuAlaka Basu
      Alaka M. Basu is Professor, Development Sociology, Cornell University, and a member of the Guttmacher-Lancet Commission on Sexual and Reproductive Rights and Health
      Alessandro RosinaAlessandro Rosina
      Professor of Demography and Director, Center for Applied Statistics in Business and Economics, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
      Andrea BrandoliniAndrea Brandolini
      Head of Statistical Analysis Directorate, Bank of Italy
      Bruno MasquelierBruno Masquelier
      Professor of Demography, University of Louvain, Belgium
      Cheikh MbackéCheikh Mbacké
      Associate Professor, Sociology department, Laval University
      Cinzia ContiCinzia Conti
      Researcher at Istat, Head of Unit on Foreign Presence and Social Dynamics
      Corrado BonifaziCorrado Bonifazi
      Director of the Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, National Research Council, Rome Italy
      Ernestina CoastErnestina Coast
      Associate Professor of Population Studies, London School of Economics
      Wang FengFeng Wang
      Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine, USA, and Professor at Fudan University, Shanghai, China fwang(at)uci.edu
      Francesco BillariFrancesco Billari
      Professor of Sociology and Demography, University of Oxford
      Gilles PisonGilles Pison
      Professor at Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle and Director of Research at the French National Institute for Demographic Studies (INED) (Paris)
      Gustavo De SantisGustavo De Santis
      Professor of Demography, University of Florence, Italy
      Jacques VallinJacques Vallin
      Emeritus Research Director at INED, Paris; Honorary President of IUSSP
      John KnodelJohn Knodel
      Research Professor Emeritus, Population Studies Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan (USA) and International staff, College of Populations Studies, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand)
      Letizia MencariniLetizia Mencarini
      Associate professor of Demography, Bocconi University - Dondena Centre for Research on Social Dynamics and Public Policy & Collegio Carlo Alberto; P.I. ERC P.I. ERC project n. 313617 (2013-2018) SWELLFER http://swellfer.wordpress.com
      Letizia TanturriLetizia Tanturri
      Associate Professor of Demography, University of Padova, Italy
      Massimo livi BacciMassimo livi Bacci
      Emeritus Professor of Demography, University of Florence, Italy
      Monica Das GuptaMonica Das Gupta
      Research Professor of Sociology, University of Maryland, USA
      OUR AUTHORS
      Paula Miranda-RibeiroPaula Miranda-Ribeiro
      Professor, Demography Department and Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.
      Peter McDonaldPeter McDonald
      Professor of Demography in the Australian National University. Honorary President of IUSSP and winner of the Irene B. Taeuber Award
      Roberto ImpicciatoreRoberto Impicciatore
      Assistant Professor of Demography, University of Milan, Italy
      Salvatore StrozzaSalvatore Strozza
      Professor of Demography, University Federico II, Naples (Italy)
      Stefano MolinaStefano Molina
      Senior Program Officer, Giovanni Agnelli Foundation, Italy
      our authors
  • N-IUSSP
    • N-IUSSP is a new IUSSP news magazine, which will disseminate scientific findings from demographic research carried out all over the world. The practical implications of current trends, the risks and potentialities of emerging situations, the pros and cons of specific laws are discussed in rigorous but plain language.

      Everybody is free to reproduce our articles, for free, provided the original source is cited.

      You are invited to contribute to this new publication: please check our guidelines and submit your 1000 word contribution to contact@niussp.org

archive 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015

How does parental separation affect children’s day-to-day life?
L’effet de la rupture conjugale sur la vie quotidienne des enfants

Marion Leturcq, Lidia Panico

Parental separation increases children’s risk of poverty The proportion of children experiencing parental divorce or separation has increased across Western countries.
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Gender quotas beat Italy’s “male gerontocracy”
Les quotas de genre ébranlent la “gérontocratie masculine” en Italie

Giulia Ferrari, Valeria Ferraro, Paola Profeta, Chiara Pronzato

A boost to female empowerment Women are underrepresented in top positions everywhere in the world.
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Demographic dividend in Africa: macro- and micro-economic effects
Dividende démographique en Afrique: effets économiques macro et micro

Michel Garenne

A fashionable but controversial concept The ‘demographic dividend’ has become a fashionable concept over the past 20 years, and was the focus of the recent UAPS conference held in South Africa in December 2015.
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The geography of female-breadwinner and equal-income couples in Europe
La géographie européenne des couples où la femme gagne autant ou plus que l’homme

Agnese Vitali, Bruno Arpino

An increasing number of couples today are dependent upon women’s labour income. Along with an increase in dual-earner couples, couples where the woman out-earns her partner are also on the rise in Europe (Vitali and Mendola 2014).
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The 21st century – the century of centenarians
XXIe siècle, siècle des centenaires

George W Leeson
old people in front of laptop

The emergence of large numbers of centenarians has accompanied the ageing of our populations. The number of people aged 100 years and over in England and Wales, for example, increased from less than 200 in 1922 to 570 in 1961. By 1981 it had climbed to 2,418 and to 12,318 in 2012. Around the world,
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Demography vs ethnography (or Understanding AIDS in Malawi)
Démographie ou ethnographie (pour comprendre le sida au Malawi)

Susan Cotts Watkins

Daniel Scott Smith, a historical demographer, said it well: demography has all the ingredients of the best novels, sex and death, but they hide the pleasure of the former under the term “fertility curves” and the terror of the latter under the term “life tables.” Ethnography lets us look under the blanket. Demographers have been
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Beyond mothers who father: the study of female headship
Au-delà des pères absents: les ménages où le chef de famille est une femme

Chia Liu

More than half of a century has passed since Edith Clark first wrote “My Mother Who Fathered Me” in 1957, a classic study on single motherhood (marriage, sex, and concubinage) in Jamaica at the time. The Caribbean, along with Latin America, continue to experience high levels of non-marital childbearing today.
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Are population policies effective?
Les politiques démographiques sont-elles efficaces ?

Jacques Vallin

Let us look at four types of objective that can legitimize population policies in a given context: reducing mortality (Vallin et Meslé, 2006), limiting fertility if the population is growing too quickly (Locoh et Vandermersch, 2006), or encouraging it if the opposite is true (De Santis, 2006), and controlling migration (Baldi et Cagiano de Azevedo,
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What stops parents from having a second child?
Pourquoi le passage au deuxième enfant est-il si difficile ?

Francesca Luppi

Parents of one child are commonly confronted by the first child’s persistent pleas for a little brother or sister. However, they might be skeptical about satisfying their child’s request because they know from experience how easily childbearing can turn their well-balanced daily life upside-down.
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Demographic data are inadequate for many older Africans
Des données démographiques insuffisantes sur les Africains les plus âgés

Ernestina Coast, Sara Randall

Why do we need better data on older people? To accurately understand population change – its scale, speed, determinants and variants – we need accurate data on the age of a population’s members.
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The shrinking population of Europe, ageing and productivity
La population de l’Europe: plus vieille, moins nombreuse et moins productive?

Massimo livi Bacci

Europe’s population is bound to shrink before 2050: according to the latest revision (2015, medium variant) of the UN (2015) projections, it will decline by 4.5% (31 million) between 2015 and 2050.
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Loneliness among seniors in Europe. Far higher risk in the East
La solitude des seniors en Europe : un risque bien plus élevé à l’Est

Thomas Hansen, Britt Slagsvold
LONLEY OLD MAN

Loneliness is widely perceived as a problem of old age, as part of “normal” aging. Research shows, however, that only 5 to 15% of adults aged 60–80 report frequent feelings of loneliness (Dykstra 2009). Yet this literature is based primarily on data from Western countries with advanced welfare systems.
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Neonatal mortality trend in Indian states, 1981-2011
La mortalité néonatale en Inde entre 1981 et 2011

Nandita Saikia, Vladimir M. Shkolnikov, Domantas Jasilionis, Chandrasekhar

According to the most recent estimates, under-five mortality¹ in India is decreasing, but the annual number of under-five deaths is still as high as 1.2 million, the largest in the world (UNICEF 2016), and several districts of India, which did not achieve the Millennium Development Goal No. 4,
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Bilan de dix ans de mariage universel en Espagne (2005-2014)
Ten years of universal marriage in Spain (2005-2014)

Alberto Capote

En 2005, l’Espagne est devenue le troisième pays de l’Union Européenne à légaliser le mariage pour les personnes du même sexe, après les Pays Bas en 2001 et la Belgique en 2003.
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China after the one-child policy: parents bereaved of their only child
Perdre son enfant unique en Chine

Quanbao Jiang, Yan Wei, Stuart Gietel-Basten

In 1980, China launched its national one-child policy, in response to both a huge concern about the prospects of rapid population growth impacting on resources and a desire to increase GDP per capita.
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The emergence of the one-child family in India
L’émergence de l’enfant unique en Inde

Alaka Basu, Sonalde Desai

The whole world knows and talks about the “one-child” phenomenon in China. Most of this discussion is tied to analyses of the one-child policy instituted by the Chinese government in 1979 and to the positive and (mostly) negative ramifications of that policy
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The drivers of children’s outcomes in Australia
Les déterminants du devenir des enfants en Australie

Rasheda Khanam

Childhood has gained renewed attention from academics, researchers and policy makers, as evidence shows that this stage of life deeply affects future educational achievements and labour market success (Blanden, Gregg and Macmillan 2007).
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In France, second unions now more resilient than first
En France, les deuxièmes unions sont devenues plus stables que les premières

Eva Beaujouan

If at first you don’t succeed … The first union used to be the one that would last “until death do us part”. The transformation in partnership behaviour emerging in most European countries since the 1960s has coincided with new attitudes and expectations about conjugal life.
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Better education has become a stabilizer of marriages in Taiwan
A Taiwan le mariage dure plus longtemps si les conjoints sont plus éduqués

Yen-hsin Alice Cheng

While divorce is usually lower in Asian than in Western societies, a drastic rise in crude divorce rates has been reported in many East Asian countries in the recent past (Dommaraju and Jones 2011). Japan, South Korea, China, and Singapore, among others, have witnessed a two- to five-fold increase in the prevalence of divorce in
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Which adult children live with their elderly parents in China?
Quels enfants adultes habitent avec leurs parents âgés en Chine?

Sen Ma, Fangqi Wen

Co-residence between elderly parents and independent, married adult children is a common phenomenon in East Asian societies. For example, according to the 2005 China Inter-Census Survey data, two thirds of elderly people aged 65 and over live with their adult children (Zeng and Xie 2014).
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On marriage, happiness, and gender specialization of work
Le mariage, le bonheur et la spécialisation genrée du travail

Małgorzata Mikucka
marriage happiness

The married are happier and more satisfied with their lives than the unmarried (Verbakel, 2012; Gove et al., 1990). Yet, as divorce and cohabitation increase, we may be facing a “retreat from marriage” (Cherlin, 2004). Besides, the life satisfaction advantage of being married (i.e., the difference between the average life satisfaction of married and unmarried
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Migration background and parental leave uptake in Sweden
Utilisation du congé parental par les femmes immigrées en Suède

Eleonora Mussino, Ann-Zofie Duvander

Introduction. Family policy in Sweden is designed to strongly encourage parents (and especially women) to combine work and family formation. The parental leave system makes it profitable for people (women) to work before becoming a parent, and this results in a number of advantages for society:
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How women in South Korea juggle work and family life
La difficile conciliation entre travail et vie familiale en Corée

Li Ma

Employment and childbearing are important stages in a woman’s life course. Their relationship is influenced not only by individual characteristics, but also by the socio-economic and institutional context. Availability of childcare services, flexible working hours, and paid leave with job protection after childbirth
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Growing education-related disparities in length of life in the US
Mortalité différentielle par niveau d’éducation aux Etats Unis

Isaac Sasson

“Time and chance happeneth to them all. For man also knoweth not his time: as the fishes that are taken in an evil net, and as the birds that are caught in the snare; so are the sons of men snared in an evil time, when it falleth suddenly upon them.” (Ecclesiastes 9, 11-12; KJV)
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Does birth order affect earnings? Only temporarily
La relation (complexe) entre rang de naissance et revenu

Marco Bertoni, Giorgio Brunello

The sooner (you are born) the better – initially. The existing empirical evidence suggests that the first-born earn a wage premium with respect to the later-born. One reason is better education.
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Fertility in Western Europe: the role of religion
Religiosité et fécondité en Europe occidentale

Nitzan Peri-Rotem

The religious landscape in Western Europe is characterised by contrasting trends; while attendance rates at religious services have declined dramatically, over half of the population in this region still identify themselves as affiliated with a particular religion (Voas 2009). What is the relevance of religion to individual behaviour in these so-called secularised countries? More specifically,
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Son preference as a new twist in China’s low fertility
La préférence pour les fils et la faible fécondité en Chine

Quanbao Jiang, Ying Li, Jesús J. Sánchez-Barricarte
China

China is now facing the challenge of low fertility. Its total fertility rate first fell below replacement level in the early 1990s, and had dropped to only 1.18 children per woman by 2010 (or, possibly, 1.5, taking account of possible underreporting; Cai, 2013). Among the drivers of fertility decline, birth control policy is considered by
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Adolescent fertility in Latin America and the Caribbean
La fécondité des adolescentes en Amérique latine et dans les Antilles

Jorge Rodriguez Vignoli

Up until the 1970s, the Latin American and Caribbean region stood out for its high levels of fertility. Decline was rapid in subsequent years, but adolescent fertility in the region is still a concern: it is the second highest in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa (Figure 1). According to the latest censuses and surveys, approximately
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Smoking in Italy since World War II
Fumer en Italie, depuis 1950

Carl Ipsen

Smoking has obviously and significantly impacted human mortality. And while the death toll from smoking may be its most striking legacy, the study of smoking also reveals aspects of social, cultural, economic and political history, all areas that I explore in my monograph on the history of smoking in Italy in the nineteenth and twentieth
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The changing American age curve of divorce
L’évolution du divorce aux Etats Unis: plus fréquent, et à des âges plus élevés

Lowell L. Hargens

The incidence of divorce, like the incidence of many other demographic phenomena, varies greatly across the life course. Divorce is most prevalent during young adulthood and relatively infrequent among the elderly, a pattern that has been present for at least a century.
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The risk of misrepresenting the demographic dividend
Le risque d’une interprétation erronée du dividende démographique

Jane O’Sullivan, Roger Martin

It is heartening to see the renewal of interest in demography by at least some African governments. A share of the credit for this can be attributed to the discourse around ‘demographic dividend’. For a couple of decades, development economists have conveyed no clear message connecting population dynamics with economic advance. Yet the evidence was
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Fertility transition in India: sub-regional evidence
La transition de la fécondité dans les districts indiens

Sanjay K. Mohanty, Günther Fink, Rajesh K. Chauhan, David Canning
Fertility

Population stabilization in India is of obvious global significance. According to the latest census, India’s population was 1,210 million in 2011, accounting for 17 percent of the global population; if current trends continue, India will become the world’s most populous country in 2022.
read more →

Lower world population growth? A matter of culture
Une moindre croissance démographique mondiale? Une question de culture

Vegard Skirbekk, Marcin Stonawski, Guido Alfani

The demographic transition, i.e., the passage from the ancient to the modern demographic regime of low fertility and low mortality, can be a highly heterogeneous process, and its impact on population growth can differ widely.
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African migration: is the continent really on the move?*
La migration africaine: s’agit-il vraiment d’un « continent en mouvement » ?*

Marie-Laurence Flahaux, Hein de Haas

General trends and directions of African migration African migration is often perceived as massive and increasing, mainly directed toward Europe, and driven by poverty and violence (Lessault and Beauchemin 2009).
read more →

Infectious diseases in ageing populations: a neglected cause of mortality?
Les maladies infectieuses dans les populations vieillissantes: une cause de décès sous-estimée ?

Aline Désesquelles, Elena Demuru, Marilena Pappagallo, Luisa Frova, France Meslé, Viviana Egidi
diseases

In countries with high life expectancies, death is predominantly the consequence of cancers and diseases of the circulatory system.
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Sustainability and the missing links in global governance
La croissance durable et les insuffisances de la gouvernance mondiale

George Martine
Sustainability

After decades of dithering, posturing and procrastination on global environmental issues, 2015 appeared to be a banner year for sustainability. Growing recognition of environmental threats finally triggered waves of public concern and more resolute official stances.
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Counting who is dying in Sub-Saharan Africa and what they are dying from: an imperative for the post-2015 agenda
Le dénombrement des décès en Afrique sub-saharienne et l’identification de leur cause : un impératif pour l’agenda post-2015

Bruno Masquelier, Gloria Mathenge

Introduction The need for timely and reliable mortality estimates is acute in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)
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An Almost Ideal Pension System for Europe (and other countries)
Un système de retraites quasiment idéal pour les pays européens (et d’autres)

Gustavo De Santis

Pay-as-you-go (PAYG) pension systems are frequent in OECD countries, usually in combination with some form of funding (OECD 2014, 2015), and they have been very extensively studied. But their reputation is not particularly good
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Do we need a population policy?

Jacques Vallin
population walking across a street

From the writings of Plato (4th century BCE) on the population of the ideal Greek city, to the famous precept of Jean Bodin (1576) “the only wealth is man”, the desire to influence the size or composition of the population is an ancient one. But highlighting our ancestors’ interest in demographic problems and their quest
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How old do you feel? It depends on whether you have grandchildren
Vous vous sentez vieux? Mais avez-vous des petits-enfants?

Valeria Bordone, Bruno Arpino

The idea of a static measure of age is changing (Christensen et al., 2009; Sanderson & Scherbov, 2013). The concept of ageing is not independent of time and place
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Deaths exceed births in most of Europe, but not in the United States, and not in Texas
Plus de décès que de naissances dans la plupart de l’Europe, mais pas aux États-Unis, et pas au Texas

Dudley L. Poston jr., Kenneth M. Johnson, Layton Field
a crowd of painted people

Prevalence of natural decrease. In the first decade of the 21st century (2000-2009), 58 percent of the 1,391 counties of Europe had more deaths than births
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Is there a gender bias in births and child mortality in Indonesia ?
Peut-on parler de discrimination sexuelle en Indonésie?

Christophe Z. Guilmoto
children indonesia

Son preference and gender bias, which are revealed in births and child mortality, tend to be concentrated in South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Europe, and the South Caucasus—places where patrilineal and patrilocal family systems prevail.
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The Merry-go-round of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals
Le manège autour des Objectifs de développement durable des Nations Unies

Alaka Basu
young woman of a country in developement

Advocacy is a funny thing. If you feel strongly enough about a cause, as everyone in international development does these days, it is no longer enough to campaign for something simply for its own sake.
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Progression de l’espérance de vie: un champ encore grand ouvert mais non sans limite
The evolution of life expectancy: limits not reached, yet

France Meslé, Jacques Vallin
old perople sitting on a bench

Si Jeanne Calment a vécu un peu plus de 122 ans et que rien n’indique clairement que ce record mondial soit une limite infranchissable, il est fort probable qu’une telle longévité ne puisse jamais être atteinte que par une infime fraction de l’humanité
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If American women have it so bad, why should India’s women not “not join” the labor force?
Pour les Indiennes comme pour les Américaines, intégrer le marché du travail n’est pas aussi facile qu’on le décrit.

Alaka Basu
indian woman working around a table

If there is one gender issue that has mainstream America rightly roiled up today, it has to do with women and work, or more specifically, women at work.
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La limite de la vie humaine
How long can we live?

Jacques Vallin
Jeanne Calment décédée a 122 ans

La doyenne de l’humanité, la française Jeanne Calment est décédée en 1997 à 122 ans et 5 mois. Bien que dûment vérifié et homologué par le groupe international de recherche sur les « super-centenaires » le cas continue d’étonner tant il reste exceptionnel, unique même. Mais, depuis, l’américaine Sarah Knauss a atteint 119 ans tandis que la
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The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development
L’agenda des Nations Unies pour le développement durable

Massimo livi Bacci
global coals U N

The United Nations Sustainable Development Summit was held in New York on 25-27 September 2015. The 193-member UN General Assembly formally adopted the ambitious agenda “Transforming Our World: 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”
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