MENUMENU
  • EDITORIAL COMMITTEE
    • Massimo livi BacciMassimo livi Bacci
      Emeritus Professor of Demography, University of Florence, Italy
      Jacques VallinJacques Vallin
      Emeritus Research Director at INED, Paris; Honorary President of IUSSP
      Alaka BasuAlaka Basu
      Professor, Dept of Development Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA and Senior Fellow, United Nations Foundation, Washington DC, USA
      Bruno MasquelierBruno Masquelier
      Professor of Demography, University of Louvain, Belgium
      Gustavo De SantisGustavo De Santis
      Professor of Demography, University of Florence, Italy
      Ernestina CoastErnestina Coast
      Associate Professor of Population Studies, London School of Economics
      Roberto ImpicciatoreRoberto Impicciatore
      Assistant Professor of Demography, University of Milan, Italy
      Salvatore StrozzaSalvatore Strozza
      Professor of Demography, University Federico II, Naples (Italy)
      Cinzia ContiCinzia Conti
      Researcher at Istat, Head of Unit on Foreign Presence and Social Dynamics
      Alessandro RosinaAlessandro Rosina
      Professor of Demography and Director, Center for Applied Statistics in Business and Economics, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
      Letizia MencariniLetizia Mencarini
      Associate professor of Demography, Bocconi University - Dondena Centre for Research on Social Dynamics and Public Policy & Collegio Carlo Alberto; P.I. ERC P.I. ERC project n. 313617 (2013-2018) SWELLFER http://swellfer.wordpress.com
      Feng WangFeng Wang
      Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine, USA, and Professor at Fudan University, Shanghai, China
      Corrado BonifaziCorrado Bonifazi
      Director of the Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, National Research Council, Rome Italy
      John KnodelJohn Knodel
      Research Professor Emeritus, Population Studies Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan (USA) and International staff, College of Populations Studies, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand)
      Gilles PisonGilles Pison
      Professor at Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle and Director of Research at the French National Institute for Demographic Studies (INED) (Paris)
      Andrea BrandoliniAndrea Brandolini
      Head of Statistical Analysis Directorate, Bank of Italy
      Peter McDonaldPeter McDonald
      Professor of Demography in the Australian National University. Honorary President of IUSSP and winner of the Irene B. Taeuber Award
      Monica Das GuptaMonica Das Gupta
      Research Professor of Sociology, University of Maryland, USA
      Stefano MolinaStefano Molina
      Senior Program Officer, Giovanni Agnelli Foundation, Italy
      Cheikh MbackéCheikh Mbacké
      Associate Professor, Sociology department, Laval University
      Letizia TanturriLetizia Tanturri
      Associate Professor of Demography, University of Padova, Italy
      Francesco BillariFrancesco Billari
      Professor of Sociology and Demography, University of Oxford
      Paula Miranda-RibeiroPaula Miranda-Ribeiro
      Professor, Demography Department and Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.
      our authors
  • N-IUSSP
    • N-IUSSP is a new IUSSP news magazine, which will disseminate scientific findings from demographic research carried out all over the world. The practical implications of current trends, the risks and potentialities of emerging situations, the pros and cons of specific laws are discussed in rigorous but plain language.

      You are invited to contribute to this new publication: please check our guidelines and submit your 1000 word contribution to contact@niussp.org

archive 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015

The pace of fertility decline in Sub-Saharan Africa
La fécondité en Afrique subsaharienne baisse plus lentement qu’ailleurs

David Shapiro, Andrew Hinde
fertility decline in Sub-Saharan Africa

Global social changes that diffuse across the world from country to country often proceed most quickly in those places that start last. Change in the pioneer regions is delayed by the extra effort required to overcome the obstacles to new ideas or practices; regions that join the trend later can draw on the experience of
read more →

Parental leave uptake among migrant and native mothers in Belgium
Prise de congé parental chez les mères immigrées et autochtones en Belgique

Tine Kil, Jonas Wood, Karel Neels

Family policies such as parental leave schemes increasingly support the work-family balance. Although labour force participation has increased in recent decades among mothers in majority populations, maternal employment levels and uptake of family policies remain low
read more →

Half the world’s population reaching below replacement fertility
La moitié de la population mondiale atteint un niveau de fécondité sous le seuil de remplacement

Tomas Frejka
replacement fertility, married couple with one children

According to the most recent UN estimates (United Nations 2017), almost one half of the world’s population lives in countries with below replacement fertility (BRF), i.e. with a total fertility rate (TFR) below 2.1 births per woman.
read more →

Smoking inequalities in France and the United States
Inégalités sociales de tabagisme en France et aux Etats-Unis

Fred Pampel, Damien Bricard, Myriam Khlat, Stéphane Legleye
Smoking

While public health officials worry about the distressingly high levels of tobacco use across the world, they increasingly recognize that smoking also worsens inequalities in health and life expectancy.
read more →

Women’s schooling, child mortality, and fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa
Scolarisation des femmes, mortalité des enfants et fécondité en Afrique subsaharienne

David Shapiro, Michel Tenikue

Over time, women’s educational attainment in sub-Saharan Africa has been increasing (Barro and Lee, 2013), while infant and child mortality have been decreasing (United Nations, 2015). Both changes have contributed to the ongoing sub-Saharan fertility decline
read more →

The world in which the next 4 billion people will live
Le monde qui accueillera les 4 milliards de personnes à venir

Richard Grossman
4 billion people

I was pleased to read Professor David Lam’s N-IUSSP essay “The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion” (Lam 2017). He outlines past, present and projected future population growth. He points out that much of the population growth will occur in Africa, and that a higher proportion will be older,
read more →

Poverty is falling faster for female-headed households in Africa
En Afrique, la pauvreté diminue plus rapidement pour les ménages dirigés par une femme

Dominique van de Walle, Annamaria Milazzo
woman households in Africa

Living standards have risen generally, and poverty rates have fallen across Sub-Saharan Africa since the late 1990s (Chen and Ravallion, 2013). Less is known about how different groups have fared.
read more →

Unstable union history linked to higher childhood mortality risk
Instabilité conjugale des mères et mortalité des enfants dans le Sud

Laurie F. DeRose
childhood mortality risk : woman with newborn

The marriage-go-round can be a costly ride for children in post-industrial countries as family instability is associated with elevated risk of negative outcomes like teen pregnancy, depression, aggression, asthma, and obesity.
read more →

The Icelandic Saga. Fertility in the midst of delayed family formation
Islande : une fécondité élevée malgré le recul de l’âge à la maternité

Ari Klængur Jónsson
Iceland city reikiavik

In European demography, Iceland has been an outlier until recently, with a fertility rate well above that of most countries on the continent. Between 1982 and 2014, the Icelandic total period fertility rate (TFR) ranged between 1.9 and 2.3 children per woman (Figure 1).
read more →

Are U.S. whites ‘hunkering down’ in racially-diverse cities and neighborhoods?
Les blancs américains préfèrent-ils le “vivre entre soi” ?

Daniel T. Lichter, Domenico Parisi, Michael C. Taquino
U.S.A. white and black people

America’s new racial diversity has upended conventional empirical approaches to residential segregation based on simple binary notions of the color line: white–black, white–nonwhite, or black–nonblack.
read more →

Migration reduces climate risk for many but not for all
La migration réduit le risque climatique (mais pas pour tous)

Martina Grecequet, Jessica Hellmann
City desert: migration reduces climate risk

As the consequences of climate change accumulate, many experts expect to see migration away from the world’s most impacted regions as people seek a climate and an economy that better sustains human life. This will add to migratory movements caused by other more traditional reasons:
read more →

Immigrant receptivity and local area unemployment in the U.S.
Chômage et perception des immigrés à l’échelle locale aux États-Unis

Gordon F. De Jong, Deborah R. Graefe, Chris Galvan, Stephanie Howe Hasanali

Recent political events in many countries have made it clear that the receptivity of immigrants by destination area citizens is a contentious issue. Natives in arrival countries have demonstrated both hostile and welcoming attitudes and behavior
read more →

Children born to a lone mother and their well-being in the UK
Le bien-être des enfants de mères célibataires au Royaume-Uni

Elena Mariani, Alice Goisis
lone mother with his children

Numerous studies have looked at the relationship between family structure and child well-being. Overall, the evidence suggests that children who grow up in a household with two married biological parents, on average, do better than those growing up with a single mother (Bernardi and Boertien 2017; Sigle-Rushton and McLanahan 2014; McLanahan et al. 2013). However,
read more →

Sharing routine housework and desire for more children in East Asia
Le partage des tâches ménagères et le désir d’enfants en Asie de l’Est

Man-Yee Kan, Ekaterina Hertog
woman doing routine housework

Low fertility levels have become a typical characteristic of industrialised countries where two distinct patterns are observed. A number of countries, especially in southern Europe and East Asia, have persistently low fertility levels. Another group of countries, such as Sweden and Finland, after a period of fluctuation, have managed to achieve fertility close to replacement
read more →

Fertility in the time of economic crisis
La fécondité aux temps de la crise économique

Chiara Ludovica Comolli
Fertility in the time of economic crisis - empty cradles

When uncertain about the stability of their present or future earnings or jobs, individuals postpone life-changing decisions. Scientific research confirms conventional wisdom and shows that the Great Recession that started in 2008 had a paralyzing effect on childbearing in most western economies. As illustrated in Figure 1, after a period of growing fertility at the
read more →

Persistent high fertility in rural Africa
Persistance d’une fécondité élevée en milieu rural africain

Michel Garenne
fertility in rural Africa: group of boys

The fertility transition, defined as a change from high and natural fertility (in a range of five to nine children per woman) to low and controlled fertility (down to two children per woman or less) started in France in the 18th century, and spread during the 19th century to other European populations, including expatriate populations
read more →

Majority to minority: the declining U.S. white population
Quand la majorité devient minorité : le cas des blancs aux Etats-Unis

Dudley L. Poston jr., Rogelio Sáenz
minority. two young black boys in new york

In this essay we document the demography of the decline of the white population in the United States, a country with a long history of white supremacy.
read more →

Internal migration drives population change in Asia
Migration interne et changement démographique en Asie

Gavin Jones
internal migration, picture o people walkingpeople walking

The three giants of Asia – China, India and Indonesia – make up 40% of the world’s population and 49% of the population of countries defined by the United Nations as developing.  
read more →

Surrogacy: a multi-faceted phenomenon
La gestation pour autrui: une réalité complexe et plurielle

Virginie Rozée, Laurent Toulemon
surrogacy: pregnent woman

Although still rare among assisted reproductive technologies (ART)¹, surrogacy is a very controversial subject: some consider it as a new way to overcome infertility,
read more →

The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion
Quatre milliards de personnes en plus. Mais différentes

David Lam
image of people. next 4 billion people

When the world population reached 7 billion in 2011, it marked the amazing addition of 4 billion people in just over 50 years, the world having attained the 3 billion milestone in 1960.
read more →

Family planning in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya
Planning familial dans les bidonvilles de Nairobi, Kenya

Donatien Beguy, Alex C. Ezeh, Blessing U. Mberu, Jacques B.O. Emina
children in Nairobi

In Kenya, rapid population growth has occurred amidst poor urban governance and limited employment opportunities, leading to widespread urban poverty that is concentrated in informal settlements or slums.
read more →

The rise of divorce, separation, and cohabitation in the Philippines
La montée des divorces, séparations et cohabitations aux Philippines

Jeofrey B. Abalos
Philippines rise of divorce

“What God has put together let no man put asunder”. This biblical quote is frequently heard among Filipinos, particularly among the older generations, to discourage young people from leaving an unsatisfactory marriage.
read more →

Recent trends in premarital fertility in sub-Saharan Africa
Évolution récente de la fécondité prénuptiale en Afrique sub-saharienne

Shelley Clark, Alissa Koski, Emily Smith-Greenaway
children: premarital fertility

Age at first marriage has been rising throughout sub-Saharan Africa for more than twenty-five years. The median age at first marriage has increased by an average of 1-2 years across the region but substantial variation in age at first marriage remains (Garenne 2004).
read more →

Think race and ethnicity are permanent? Think again
Surprise! Race et appartenance ethnique changent au fil du temps

Carolyn A. Liebler, Sonya R. Porter, Leticia E. Fernandez, James M. Noon, Sharon R. Ennis
picture showing people of different race and ethnicity

Add something else to the list of things that seem simple but are actually complicated – the way someone reports their race or ethnicity. In a recently-published research article (Liebler et al. 2017), we used a large, unique linked dataset from two U.S. Censuses
read more →

Marriage is useless (for wages)
Se marier est inutile (pour gagner plus)

Alexandra Killewald, Ian Lundberg
marriage is useless for wages: rings and money

On average, in the United States, men earn more per hour when married than when single, even after adjusting for differences such as age and education. However, despite the suggestive evidence that marriage may exert a causal effect on men’s wages, we argue that closer inspection reveals little evidence of such a link. Why might
read more →

Recent fertility changes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Évolution récente de la fécondité en République démocratique du Congo

David Shapiro, Basile O. Tambashe
Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the third most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of the countries with the highest fertility in the world, at 6.6 children per woman in the country’s most recent Demographic and Health Survey (MPSMRM et al 2014). It is also one of the very few countries
read more →

ISIS genocide of the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar, Iraq
Le génocide par Daech de la minorité religieuse Yazidi de Sinjar, en Irak

Valeria Cetorelli, Isaac Sasson, Nazar Shabila, Gilbert Burnham

A UN Independent International Commission of Inquiry has determined that ISIS acts against the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar constitute a case of ongoing genocide (OHCR 2016).
read more →

Non-cohabiting relationships: mainly a transitional situation
Le couple à distance: une situation avant tout transitoire

Arnaud Régnier-Loilier

Formerly synonymous with marriage, cohabitation has become a lasting form of union in France and this country is now among those where the practice is most widespread (Prioux 2009).
read more →

Population density interacts with sanitation to predict child health
Densité de population, équipements sanitaires et santé des enfants

Diane Coffey, Payal Hathi
Population density: child in India

Studies on child health in developing countries often find that children are healthier in urban areas than in rural areas. There are many reasons for this disparity. People in urban areas tend to be richer and better educated. Further, more densely populated places are more likely to have easier access to health services that matter
read more →

Teenage immigrants fare worse than younger immigrants in Norway
Les migrants adolescents réussissent moins bien que les migrants plus jeunes en Norvège

Are Skeie Hermansen

Immigration during childhood represents an important turning point for future developmental trajectories, and the timing of this event (i.e., age at arrival) has an impact on later-life educational success and economic opportunities (Hermansen, 2017). About 15 percent of the world’s migrants are under the age of 20. That is almost 37 million people according to
read more →

Past fertility and living alone in later life in Spain
La fécondité et le risque de vivre seule au grand âge en Espagne

David S. Reher, Miguel Requena
woman in later life in Spain

The prevalence of living alone during later life varies widely across developed countries but everywhere its recent growth has been remarkable, even in societies with traditionally strong family ties. Fertility has been very low in these countries for decades now, especially in the eastern and southern fringes of Europe, and there are simultaneous increases in
read more →

Increasing residential age segregation in Britain
Augmentation de la ségrégation résidentielle selon l’âge en Grande-Bretagne

Albert Sabater, Elspeth Graham, Nissa Finney
residential age segregation

The age differentiation of neighbourhoods is often viewed as natural, inevitable or unproblematic, with the view of particular places as appropriate for some age groups while others are not. Increases over the past century in the “chronolization” of life – the use of age to determine what activities and spaces individuals will engage or live
read more →

First birth postponement and fertility in Europe
Report des premières naissances et fécondité en Europe

Hippolyte d’Albis, Angela Greulich, Gregory Ponthière

The postponement of first childbirth has been occurring in most European countries for some decades now. In public and media discussion, delayed childbearing is often rather glibly associated with the fact that more women are going to university and getting jobs, and that they consequently want fewer children. Researchers find that for women born in
read more →

How comparable are self-reported health data on the older population in Europe?
L’état de santé perçu des personnes âgées en Europe. Les données sont-elles comparables ?

Katherine Keenan, Else Foverskov, Emily Grundy

Europe has large projected increases in the proportion of older people in the population (United Nations 2013). Therefore, high quality, representative longitudinal data on the older European population are essential to develop our understanding of age-related changes in socio-demographic circumstances, health, resources and activity patterns. The SHARE and GGS surveys Two notable sources of large
read more →

The demography of Trump’s wall
Le mur de Trump et ses conséquences démographiques

Dudley L. Poston jr., Peter A. Morrison

A major feature of the presidential campaign of Donald Trump was his pledge to build a wall on the southern border of the United States that would stop once and forever the “illegal” migration of Mexicans and others from Central America. He told his supporters that Mexico would pay for the wall. But he has
read more →

The economic and fiscal impact of immigration in the US
L’impact économique et fiscal de l’immigration aux États-Unis

Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie

More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, immigrants and their children comprise almost one in four Americans. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts
read more →

Will international adoption be replaced by surrogacy?
La gestation pour autrui va-t-elle remplacer l’adoption internationale?

Jean-François Mignot

Until the 1960s and 1970s, infecund (sterile) Western couples who desired a child but could not have one of their own could usually adopt a child in their home country. However, as contraception developed and induced abortion became legal in the West, fewer and fewer children were unwanted and abandoned by their birth parents and
read more →

Does birth spacing matter for long-term outcomes?
Intervalles intergénésiques: quelles conséquences sur le devenir des enfants?

Kieron Barclay

In a study recently published in the journal Demography, my co-author Martin Kolk and I examined whether the length of spacing between births is related to long-term cognitive, educational, and socioeconomic outcomes (Open Access paper available here).
read more →

Marriage then the baby carriage?
Mariage et fécondité dans les pays développés d’aujourd’hui

Jennifer A. Holland

The mid-20th-century was a Golden Age of marriage in Europe and the United States. People married early, usually in their early-to-mid-20s, and often, with over 90% of people marrying at least once in most countries (Sobotka & Toulemon 2008). Fast forward to the early 21st century: fewer people marry and those who do wait longer,
read more →

Eradicating induced abortion? Lessons from 20th Century France
Empêcher l’avortement? L’histoire française du XXe siècle

Fabrice Cahen

In France, for two decades – roughly from the late 1930s to the late 1950s – induced abortion was not only prohibited, it was well and truly the target of a war (Cahen, 2016). What can 21st century citizens learn from this historical episode? From moral rejection to public policies The moral perception of induced
read more →

Childlessness in Europe
Rester sans enfants en Europe

Michaela Kreyenfeld

High levels of childlessness may seem typical of individualized modern societies. However, the phenomenon has been widespread throughout human history. From the Early Modern Period, marriage and childbearing were strictly regulated by law and custom.
read more →

Assimilation and birth outcomes of Hispanics in the US
Mariages mixtes et issue des grossesses des Hispaniques aux États Unis

Osea Giuntella

The immigrant health effect is a well-known public health fact observed in many advanced economies. Immigrants tend to be healthier than natives, though their health advantage erodes over time.
read more →

Vital registration in Africa: when will it be complete?
À quand un état civil exhaustif en Afrique?

Michel Garenne, Pierre Cantrelle

Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CR/VS) is an essential administrative system in modern societies. The registration of births and deaths defines a number of basic rights and duties, and is compulsory for the rule of law, legal identity, social security systems and many other aspects of social life. The publication and analysis of vital statistics
read more →

Health effects of working beyond State Pension Age in England
Travailler après l’âge légal de la retraite: effets sur la santé en Angleterre

Giorgio Di Gessa, Laurie M Corna, Loretta Platts, Diana Worts, Peggy McDonough, Amanda Sacker, Debora Price, Karen Glaser

Paid work in adulthood is generally considered beneficial for physical and psychological health and well-being (Woodell and Burton 2006) but its effects at older ages are unclear.
read more →

International differences in life expectancy gains (and in their cost)
Vivre plus longtemps (et le prix à payer) dans 14 pays développés

Nick Parr, Jackie Li, Leonie Tickle
life expectancy - old people walking

Ongoing increases in life expectancies may slow the growth of living standards in developed countries. One reason for this is that reductions in mortality rates, which these days are generally greater in the older ages
read more →

Does parental separation increase inequality of educational opportunity?
La rupture conjugale augmente-t-elle les inégalités d’accès aux études?

Fabrizio Bernardi, Diederik Boertien
mum and teacher in school talking about parental separation

Our research (Bernardi & Boertien 2016a; 2016b) has led us to the conclusion that, while children growing up without one parent in the household do have lower educational attainment,
read more →

In France, male managers live six years longer than male manual workers
En France, un cadre vit six ans de plus qu’un ouvrier

Nathalie Blanpain

We all die one day, but we are not all equal in this respect, because death tends to strike at different ages. Take men and women, for instance: in France, under the mortality conditions of 2009-2013,
read more →

Strong growth projected for Australia’s Indigenous population
Projections de forte croissance de la population autochtone australienne

Tom Wilson

Australia’s Indigenous population Australia’s Indigenous population consists of its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Aboriginal peoples are estimated to have settled the Australian continent approximately 50,000 years ago
read more →

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close