archive 2017 2016 2015

Parental leave uptake among migrant and native mothers in Belgium
Prise de congé parental chez les mères immigrées et autochtones en Belgique

Tine Kil, Jonas Wood, Karel Neels
Kill_niussp_ART

Family policies such as parental leave schemes increasingly support the work-family balance. Although labour force participation has increased in recent decades among mothers in majority populations, maternal employment levels and uptake of family policies remain low in migrant populations across Europe, and the two are related: precarious employment trajectories may limit access to parental leave
read more →

Half the world’s population reaching below replacement fertility
La moitié de la population mondiale atteint un niveau de fécondité sous le seuil de remplacement

Tomas Frejka
replacement fertility, married couple with one children

According to the most recent UN estimates (United Nations 2017), almost one half of the world’s population lives in countries with below replacement fertility (BRF), i.e. with a total fertility rate (TFR) below 2.1 births per woman.
read more →

Smoking inequalities in France and the United States
Inégalités sociales de tabagisme en France et aux Etats-Unis

Fred Pampel, Damien Bricard, Myriam Khlat, Stéphane Legleye
Smoking

While public health officials worry about the distressingly high levels of tobacco use across the world, they increasingly recognize that smoking also worsens inequalities in health and life expectancy.
read more →

Women’s schooling, child mortality, and fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa
Scolarisation des femmes, mortalité des enfants et fécondité en Afrique subsaharienne

David Shapiro, Michel Tenikue
Shapiro_ART

Over time, women’s educational attainment in sub-Saharan Africa has been increasing (Barro and Lee, 2013), while infant and child mortality have been decreasing (United Nations, 2015). Both changes have contributed to the ongoing sub-Saharan fertility decline
read more →

The world in which the next 4 billion people will live
Le monde qui accueillera les 4 milliards de personnes à venir

Richard Grossman
4 billion people

I was pleased to read Professor David Lam’s N-IUSSP essay “The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion” (Lam 2017). He outlines past, present and projected future population growth. He points out that much of the population growth will occur in Africa, and that a higher proportion will be older,
read more →

Poverty is falling faster for female-headed households in Africa
En Afrique, la pauvreté diminue plus rapidement pour les ménages dirigés par une femme

Dominique van de Walle, Annamaria Milazzo
woman households in Africa

Living standards have risen generally, and poverty rates have fallen across Sub-Saharan Africa since the late 1990s (Chen and Ravallion, 2013). Less is known about how different groups have fared.
read more →

Unstable union history linked to higher childhood mortality risk
Instabilité conjugale des mères et mortalité des enfants dans le Sud

Laurie F. DeRose
childhood mortality risk : woman with newborn

The marriage-go-round can be a costly ride for children in post-industrial countries as family instability is associated with elevated risk of negative outcomes like teen pregnancy, depression, aggression, asthma, and obesity.
read more →

The Icelandic Saga. Fertility in the midst of delayed family formation
Islande : une fécondité élevée malgré le recul de l’âge à la maternité

Ari Klængur Jónsson
Iceland city reikiavik

In European demography, Iceland has been an outlier until recently, with a fertility rate well above that of most countries on the continent. Between 1982 and 2014, the Icelandic total period fertility rate (TFR) ranged between 1.9 and 2.3 children per woman (Figure 1).
read more →

Are U.S. whites ‘hunkering down’ in racially-diverse cities and neighborhoods?
Les blancs américains préfèrent-ils le “vivre entre soi” ?

Daniel T. Lichter, Domenico Parisi, Michael C. Taquino
U.S.A. white and black people

America’s new racial diversity has upended conventional empirical approaches to residential segregation based on simple binary notions of the color line: white–black, white–nonwhite, or black–nonblack.
read more →

Migration reduces climate risk for many but not for all
La migration réduit le risque climatique (mais pas pour tous)

Martina Grecequet, Jessica Hellmann
City desert: migration reduces climate risk

As the consequences of climate change accumulate, many experts expect to see migration away from the world’s most impacted regions as people seek a climate and an economy that better sustains human life. This will add to migratory movements caused by other more traditional reasons:
read more →

Immigrant receptivity and local area unemployment in the U.S.
Chômage et perception des immigrés à l’échelle locale aux États-Unis

Gordon F. De Jong, Deborah R. Graefe, Chris Galvan, Stephanie Howe Hasanali
Niussp_chomage3

Recent political events in many countries have made it clear that the receptivity of immigrants by destination area citizens is a contentious issue. Natives in arrival countries have demonstrated both hostile and welcoming attitudes and behavior
read more →

Children born to a lone mother and their well-being in the UK
Le bien-être des enfants de mères célibataires au Royaume-Uni

Elena Mariani, Alice Goisis
lone mother with his children

Numerous studies have looked at the relationship between family structure and child well-being. Overall, the evidence suggests that children who grow up in a household with two married biological parents, on average, do better than those growing up with a single mother (Bernardi and Boertien 2017; Sigle-Rushton and McLanahan 2014; McLanahan et al. 2013). However,
read more →

Sharing routine housework and desire for more children in East Asia
Le partage des tâches ménagères et le désir d’enfants en Asie de l’Est

Man-Yee Kan, Ekaterina Hertog
woman doing routine housework

Low fertility levels have become a typical characteristic of industrialised countries where two distinct patterns are observed. A number of countries, especially in southern Europe and East Asia, have persistently low fertility levels. Another group of countries, such as Sweden and Finland, after a period of fluctuation, have managed to achieve fertility close to replacement
read more →

Fertility in the time of economic crisis
La fécondité aux temps de la crise économique

Chiara Ludovica Comolli
Fertility in the time of economic crisis - empty cradles

When uncertain about the stability of their present or future earnings or jobs, individuals postpone life-changing decisions. Scientific research confirms conventional wisdom and shows that the Great Recession that started in 2008 had a paralyzing effect on childbearing in most western economies. As illustrated in Figure 1, after a period of growing fertility at the
read more →

Persistent high fertility in rural Africa
Persistance d’une fécondité élevée en milieu rural africain

Michel Garenne
fertility in rural Africa: group of boys

The fertility transition, defined as a change from high and natural fertility (in a range of five to nine children per woman) to low and controlled fertility (down to two children per woman or less) started in France in the 18th century, and spread during the 19th century to other European populations, including expatriate populations
read more →

Majority to minority: the declining U.S. white population
Quand la majorité devient minorité : le cas des blancs aux Etats-Unis

Dudley L. Poston jr., Rogelio Sáenz
minority. two young black boys in new york

In this essay we document the demography of the decline of the white population in the United States, a country with a long history of white supremacy.
read more →

Internal migration drives population change in Asia
Migration interne et changement démographique en Asie

Gavin Jones
internal migration, picture o people walkingpeople walking

The three giants of Asia – China, India and Indonesia – make up 40% of the world’s population and 49% of the population of countries defined by the United Nations as developing.  
read more →

Surrogacy: a multi-faceted phenomenon
La gestation pour autrui: une réalité complexe et plurielle

Virginie Rozée, Laurent Toulemon
surrogacy: pregnent woman

Although still rare among assisted reproductive technologies (ART)¹, surrogacy is a very controversial subject: some consider it as a new way to overcome infertility,
read more →

The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion
Quatre milliards de personnes en plus. Mais différentes

David Lam
image of people. next 4 billion people

When the world population reached 7 billion in 2011, it marked the amazing addition of 4 billion people in just over 50 years, the world having attained the 3 billion milestone in 1960.
read more →

Family planning in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya
Planning familial dans les bidonvilles de Nairobi, Kenya

Donatien Beguy, Alex C. Ezeh, Blessing U. Mberu, Jacques B.O. Emina
children in Nairobi

In Kenya, rapid population growth has occurred amidst poor urban governance and limited employment opportunities, leading to widespread urban poverty that is concentrated in informal settlements or slums.
read more →

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close