Tag Archives: Americas

Immigrant receptivity and local area unemployment in the U.S.
Chômage et perception des immigrés à l’échelle locale aux États-Unis

Gordon F. De Jong, Deborah R. Graefe, Chris Galvan, Stephanie Howe Hasanali
Niussp_chomage3

Recent political events in many countries have made it clear that the receptivity of immigrants by destination area citizens is a contentious issue. Natives in arrival countries have demonstrated both hostile and welcoming attitudes and behavior
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Majority to minority: the declining U.S. white population
Quand la majorité devient minorité : le cas des blancs aux Etats-Unis

Dudley L. Poston jr., Rogelio Sáenz
minority. two young black boys in new york

In this essay we document the demography of the decline of the white population in the United States, a country with a long history of white supremacy.
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Think race and ethnicity are permanent? Think again
Surprise! Race et appartenance ethnique changent au fil du temps

Carolyn A. Liebler, Sonya R. Porter, Leticia E. Fernandez, James M. Noon, Sharon R. Ennis
picture showing people of different race and ethnicity

Add something else to the list of things that seem simple but are actually complicated – the way someone reports their race or ethnicity. In a recently-published research article (Liebler et al. 2017), we used a large, unique linked dataset from two U.S. Censuses
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The demography of Trump’s wall
Le mur de Trump et ses conséquences démographiques

Dudley L. Poston jr., Peter A. Morrison
Schermata-2017-03-30-alle-15.58.50

A major feature of the presidential campaign of Donald Trump was his pledge to build a wall on the southern border of the United States that would stop once and forever the “illegal” migration of Mexicans and others from Central America. He told his supporters that Mexico would pay for the wall. But he has
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The economic and fiscal impact of immigration in the US
L’impact économique et fiscal de l’immigration aux États-Unis

Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie
ImmigrationUsa_niussp

More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, immigrants and their children comprise almost one in four Americans. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts
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Assimilation and birth outcomes of Hispanics in the US
Mariages mixtes et issue des grossesses des Hispaniques aux États Unis

Osea Giuntella
Hispanic2

The immigrant health effect is a well-known public health fact observed in many advanced economies. Immigrants tend to be healthier than natives, though their health advantage erodes over time.
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Beyond mothers who father: the study of female headship
Au-delà des pères absents: les ménages où le chef de famille est une femme

Chia Liu
motherswhofothers2

More than half of a century has passed since Edith Clark first wrote “My Mother Who Fathered Me” in 1957, a classic study on single motherhood (marriage, sex, and concubinage) in Jamaica at the time. The Caribbean, along with Latin America, continue to experience high levels of non-marital childbearing today.
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Growing education-related disparities in length of life in the US
Mortalité différentielle par niveau d’éducation aux Etats Unis

Isaac Sasson
Susson2

“Time and chance happeneth to them all. For man also knoweth not his time: as the fishes that are taken in an evil net, and as the birds that are caught in the snare; so are the sons of men snared in an evil time, when it falleth suddenly upon them.” (Ecclesiastes 9, 11-12; KJV)
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Adolescent fertility in Latin America and the Caribbean
La fécondité des adolescentes en Amérique latine et dans les Antilles

Jorge Rodriguez Vignoli
Vignoli

Up until the 1970s, the Latin American and Caribbean region stood out for its high levels of fertility. Decline was rapid in subsequent years, but adolescent fertility in the region is still a concern: it is the second highest in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa (Figure 1). According to the latest censuses and surveys, approximately
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The changing American age curve of divorce
L’évolution du divorce aux Etats Unis: plus fréquent, et à des âges plus élevés

Lowell L. Hargens
Niussp_hargens

The incidence of divorce, like the incidence of many other demographic phenomena, varies greatly across the life course. Divorce is most prevalent during young adulthood and relatively infrequent among the elderly, a pattern that has been present for at least a century.
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Lower world population growth? A matter of culture
Une moindre croissance démographique mondiale? Une question de culture

Vegard Skirbekk, Marcin Stonawski, Guido Alfani
sikk2

The demographic transition, i.e., the passage from the ancient to the modern demographic regime of low fertility and low mortality, can be a highly heterogeneous process, and its impact on population growth can differ widely.
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Deaths exceed births in most of Europe, but not in the United States, and not in Texas
Plus de décès que de naissances dans la plupart de l’Europe, mais pas aux États-Unis, et pas au Texas

Dudley L. Poston jr., Kenneth M. Johnson, Layton Field
a crowd of painted people

Prevalence of natural decrease. In the first decade of the 21st century (2000-2009), 58 percent of the 1,391 counties of Europe had more deaths than births
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If American women have it so bad, why should India’s women not “not join” the labor force?
Pour les Indiennes comme pour les Américaines, intégrer le marché du travail n’est pas aussi facile qu’on le décrit.

Alaka Basu
indian woman working around a table

If there is one gender issue that has mainstream America rightly roiled up today, it has to do with women and work, or more specifically, women at work.
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The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development
L’agenda des Nations Unies pour le développement durable

Massimo livi Bacci
global coals U N

The United Nations Sustainable Development Summit was held in New York on 25-27 September 2015. The 193-member UN General Assembly formally adopted the ambitious agenda “Transforming Our World: 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”
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