Tag Archives: Children

Unstable union history linked to higher childhood mortality risk
Instabilité conjugale des mères et mortalité des enfants dans le Sud

Laurie F. DeRose
childhood mortality risk : woman with newborn

The marriage-go-round can be a costly ride for children in post-industrial countries as family instability is associated with elevated risk of negative outcomes like teen pregnancy, depression, aggression, asthma, and obesity.
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Children born to a lone mother and their well-being in the UK
Le bien-être des enfants de mères célibataires au Royaume-Uni

Elena Mariani, Alice Goisis
lone mother with his children

Numerous studies have looked at the relationship between family structure and child well-being. Overall, the evidence suggests that children who grow up in a household with two married biological parents, on average, do better than those growing up with a single mother (Bernardi and Boertien 2017; Sigle-Rushton and McLanahan 2014; McLanahan et al. 2013). However,
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Persistent high fertility in rural Africa
Persistance d’une fécondité élevée en milieu rural africain

Michel Garenne
fertility in rural Africa: group of boys

The fertility transition, defined as a change from high and natural fertility (in a range of five to nine children per woman) to low and controlled fertility (down to two children per woman or less) started in France in the 18th century, and spread during the 19th century to other European populations, including expatriate populations
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Internal migration drives population change in Asia
Migration interne et changement démographique en Asie

Gavin Jones
internal migration, picture o people walkingpeople walking

The three giants of Asia – China, India and Indonesia – make up 40% of the world’s population and 49% of the population of countries defined by the United Nations as developing.  
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Family planning in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya
Planning familial dans les bidonvilles de Nairobi, Kenya

Donatien Beguy, Alex C. Ezeh, Blessing U. Mberu, Jacques B.O. Emina
children in Nairobi

In Kenya, rapid population growth has occurred amidst poor urban governance and limited employment opportunities, leading to widespread urban poverty that is concentrated in informal settlements or slums.
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Population density interacts with sanitation to predict child health
Densité de population, équipements sanitaires et santé des enfants

Diane Coffey, Payal Hathi
Population density: child in India

Studies on child health in developing countries often find that children are healthier in urban areas than in rural areas. There are many reasons for this disparity. People in urban areas tend to be richer and better educated. Further, more densely populated places are more likely to have easier access to health services that matter
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Does birth spacing matter for long-term outcomes?
Intervalles intergénésiques: quelles conséquences sur le devenir des enfants?

Kieron Barclay
niussp_13marzo2

In a study recently published in the journal Demography, my co-author Martin Kolk and I examined whether the length of spacing between births is related to long-term cognitive, educational, and socioeconomic outcomes (Open Access paper available here).
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Eradicating induced abortion? Lessons from 20th Century France
Empêcher l’avortement? L’histoire française du XXe siècle

Fabrice Cahen
avortement

In France, for two decades – roughly from the late 1930s to the late 1950s – induced abortion was not only prohibited, it was well and truly the target of a war (Cahen, 2016). What can 21st century citizens learn from this historical episode? From moral rejection to public policies The moral perception of induced
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Childlessness in Europe
Rester sans enfants en Europe

Michaela Kreyenfeld
culle-vuote2

High levels of childlessness may seem typical of individualized modern societies. However, the phenomenon has been widespread throughout human history. From the Early Modern Period, marriage and childbearing were strictly regulated by law and custom.
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How does parental separation affect children’s day-to-day life?
L’effet de la rupture conjugale sur la vie quotidienne des enfants

Marion Leturcq, Lidia Panico
fotoperniussp2

Parental separation increases children’s risk of poverty The proportion of children experiencing parental divorce or separation has increased across Western countries.
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Beyond mothers who father: the study of female headship
Au-delà des pères absents: les ménages où le chef de famille est une femme

Chia Liu
motherswhofothers2

More than half of a century has passed since Edith Clark first wrote “My Mother Who Fathered Me” in 1957, a classic study on single motherhood (marriage, sex, and concubinage) in Jamaica at the time. The Caribbean, along with Latin America, continue to experience high levels of non-marital childbearing today.
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What stops parents from having a second child?
Pourquoi le passage au deuxième enfant est-il si difficile ?

Francesca Luppi
luppi_2

Parents of one child are commonly confronted by the first child’s persistent pleas for a little brother or sister. However, they might be skeptical about satisfying their child’s request because they know from experience how easily childbearing can turn their well-balanced daily life upside-down.
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Neonatal mortality trend in Indian states, 1981-2011
La mortalité néonatale en Inde entre 1981 et 2011

Nandita Saikia, Vladimir M. Shkolnikov, Domantas Jasilionis, Chandrasekhar
india2

According to the most recent estimates, under-five mortality¹ in India is decreasing, but the annual number of under-five deaths is still as high as 1.2 million, the largest in the world (UNICEF 2016), and several districts of India, which did not achieve the Millennium Development Goal No. 4,
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China after the one-child policy: parents bereaved of their only child
Perdre son enfant unique en Chine

Quanbao Jiang, Yan Wei, Stuart Gietel-Basten
niussp_jiangweibastel_120916

In 1980, China launched its national one-child policy, in response to both a huge concern about the prospects of rapid population growth impacting on resources and a desire to increase GDP per capita.
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The emergence of the one-child family in India
L’émergence de l’enfant unique en Inde

Alaka Basu, Sonalde Desai
Niussp_Basu_5916_2

The whole world knows and talks about the “one-child” phenomenon in China. Most of this discussion is tied to analyses of the one-child policy instituted by the Chinese government in 1979 and to the positive and (mostly) negative ramifications of that policy
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The drivers of children’s outcomes in Australia
Les déterminants du devenir des enfants en Australie

Rasheda Khanam
Niussp25_luglio2016_2

Childhood has gained renewed attention from academics, researchers and policy makers, as evidence shows that this stage of life deeply affects future educational achievements and labour market success (Blanden, Gregg and Macmillan 2007).
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Better education has become a stabilizer of marriages in Taiwan
A Taiwan le mariage dure plus longtemps si les conjoints sont plus éduqués

Yen-hsin Alice Cheng
Chang_niussp

While divorce is usually lower in Asian than in Western societies, a drastic rise in crude divorce rates has been reported in many East Asian countries in the recent past (Dommaraju and Jones 2011). Japan, South Korea, China, and Singapore, among others, have witnessed a two- to five-fold increase in the prevalence of divorce in
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Which adult children live with their elderly parents in China?
Quels enfants adultes habitent avec leurs parents âgés en Chine?

Sen Ma, Fangqi Wen
Niussp4luglio2

Co-residence between elderly parents and independent, married adult children is a common phenomenon in East Asian societies. For example, according to the 2005 China Inter-Census Survey data, two thirds of elderly people aged 65 and over live with their adult children (Zeng and Xie 2014).
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Migration background and parental leave uptake in Sweden
Utilisation du congé parental par les femmes immigrées en Suède

Eleonora Mussino, Ann-Zofie Duvander
Donnelavorosvezia2

Introduction. Family policy in Sweden is designed to strongly encourage parents (and especially women) to combine work and family formation. The parental leave system makes it profitable for people (women) to work before becoming a parent, and this results in a number of advantages for society:
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Does birth order affect earnings? Only temporarily
La relation (complexe) entre rang de naissance et revenu

Marco Bertoni, Giorgio Brunello
Fratelli2

The sooner (you are born) the better – initially. The existing empirical evidence suggests that the first-born earn a wage premium with respect to the later-born. One reason is better education.
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