Tag Archives: Europe

Parental leave uptake among migrant and native mothers in Belgium
Prise de congé parental chez les mères immigrées et autochtones en Belgique

Tine Kil, Jonas Wood, Karel Neels
Kill_niussp_ART

Family policies such as parental leave schemes increasingly support the work-family balance. Although labour force participation has increased in recent decades among mothers in majority populations, maternal employment levels and uptake of family policies remain low in migrant populations across Europe, and the two are related: precarious employment trajectories may limit access to parental leave
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The Icelandic Saga. Fertility in the midst of delayed family formation
Islande : une fécondité élevée malgré le recul de l’âge à la maternité

Ari Klængur Jónsson
Iceland city reikiavik

In European demography, Iceland has been an outlier until recently, with a fertility rate well above that of most countries on the continent. Between 1982 and 2014, the Icelandic total period fertility rate (TFR) ranged between 1.9 and 2.3 children per woman (Figure 1).
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Teenage immigrants fare worse than younger immigrants in Norway
Les migrants adolescents réussissent moins bien que les migrants plus jeunes en Norvège

Are Skeie Hermansen
Noeway_art

Immigration during childhood represents an important turning point for future developmental trajectories, and the timing of this event (i.e., age at arrival) has an impact on later-life educational success and economic opportunities (Hermansen, 2017). About 15 percent of the world’s migrants are under the age of 20. That is almost 37 million people according to
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Past fertility and living alone in later life in Spain
La fécondité et le risque de vivre seule au grand âge en Espagne

David S. Reher, Miguel Requena
woman in later life in Spain

The prevalence of living alone during later life varies widely across developed countries but everywhere its recent growth has been remarkable, even in societies with traditionally strong family ties. Fertility has been very low in these countries for decades now, especially in the eastern and southern fringes of Europe, and there are simultaneous increases in
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Increasing residential age segregation in Britain
Augmentation de la ségrégation résidentielle selon l’âge en Grande-Bretagne

Albert Sabater, Elspeth Graham, Nissa Finney
residential age segregation

The age differentiation of neighbourhoods is often viewed as natural, inevitable or unproblematic, with the view of particular places as appropriate for some age groups while others are not. Increases over the past century in the “chronolization” of life – the use of age to determine what activities and spaces individuals will engage or live
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First birth postponement and fertility in Europe
Report des premières naissances et fécondité en Europe

Hippolyte d’Albis, Angela Greulich, Gregory Ponthière
niussp_motherhood_articolo

The postponement of first childbirth has been occurring in most European countries for some decades now. In public and media discussion, delayed childbearing is often rather glibly associated with the fact that more women are going to university and getting jobs, and that they consequently want fewer children. Researchers find that for women born in
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How comparable are self-reported health data on the older population in Europe?
L’état de santé perçu des personnes âgées en Europe. Les données sont-elles comparables ?

Katherine Keenan, Else Foverskov, Emily Grundy
Niussp_oggi3

Europe has large projected increases in the proportion of older people in the population (United Nations 2013). Therefore, high quality, representative longitudinal data on the older European population are essential to develop our understanding of age-related changes in socio-demographic circumstances, health, resources and activity patterns. The SHARE and GGS surveys Two notable sources of large
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Marriage then the baby carriage?
Mariage et fécondité dans les pays développés d’aujourd’hui

Jennifer A. Holland
Niussp_marriage2

The mid-20th-century was a Golden Age of marriage in Europe and the United States. People married early, usually in their early-to-mid-20s, and often, with over 90% of people marrying at least once in most countries (Sobotka & Toulemon 2008). Fast forward to the early 21st century: fewer people marry and those who do wait longer,
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Childlessness in Europe
Rester sans enfants en Europe

Michaela Kreyenfeld
culle-vuote2

High levels of childlessness may seem typical of individualized modern societies. However, the phenomenon has been widespread throughout human history. From the Early Modern Period, marriage and childbearing were strictly regulated by law and custom.
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In France, male managers live six years longer than male manual workers
En France, un cadre vit six ans de plus qu’un ouvrier

Nathalie Blanpain
malemanager2

We all die one day, but we are not all equal in this respect, because death tends to strike at different ages. Take men and women, for instance: in France, under the mortality conditions of 2009-2013,
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The geography of female-breadwinner and equal-income couples in Europe
La géographie européenne des couples où la femme gagne autant ou plus que l’homme

Agnese Vitali, Bruno Arpino
breadwinner2

An increasing number of couples today are dependent upon women’s labour income. Along with an increase in dual-earner couples, couples where the woman out-earns her partner are also on the rise in Europe (Vitali and Mendola 2014).
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The 21st century – the century of centenarians
XXIe siècle, siècle des centenaires

George W Leeson
old people in front of laptop

The emergence of large numbers of centenarians has accompanied the ageing of our populations. The number of people aged 100 years and over in England and Wales, for example, increased from less than 200 in 1922 to 570 in 1961. By 1981 it had climbed to 2,418 and to 12,318 in 2012. Around the world,
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The shrinking population of Europe, ageing and productivity
La population de l’Europe: plus vieille, moins nombreuse et moins productive?

Massimo livi Bacci
livi_niussp2

Europe’s population is bound to shrink before 2050: according to the latest revision (2015, medium variant) of the UN (2015) projections, it will decline by 4.5% (31 million) between 2015 and 2050.
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In France, second unions now more resilient than first
En France, les deuxièmes unions sont devenues plus stables que les premières

Eva Beaujouan
Beaujouan

If at first you don’t succeed … The first union used to be the one that would last “until death do us part”. The transformation in partnership behaviour emerging in most European countries since the 1960s has coincided with new attitudes and expectations about conjugal life.
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Migration background and parental leave uptake in Sweden
Utilisation du congé parental par les femmes immigrées en Suède

Eleonora Mussino, Ann-Zofie Duvander
Donnelavorosvezia2

Introduction. Family policy in Sweden is designed to strongly encourage parents (and especially women) to combine work and family formation. The parental leave system makes it profitable for people (women) to work before becoming a parent, and this results in a number of advantages for society:
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Fertility in Western Europe: the role of religion
Religiosité et fécondité en Europe occidentale

Nitzan Peri-Rotem
Niussp_23_maggio2

The religious landscape in Western Europe is characterised by contrasting trends; while attendance rates at religious services have declined dramatically, over half of the population in this region still identify themselves as affiliated with a particular religion (Voas 2009). What is the relevance of religion to individual behaviour in these so-called secularised countries? More specifically,
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Smoking in Italy since World War II
Fumer en Italie, depuis 1950

Carl Ipsen
CP7_Edelweiss

Smoking has obviously and significantly impacted human mortality. And while the death toll from smoking may be its most striking legacy, the study of smoking also reveals aspects of social, cultural, economic and political history, all areas that I explore in my monograph on the history of smoking in Italy in the nineteenth and twentieth
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Lower world population growth? A matter of culture
Une moindre croissance démographique mondiale? Une question de culture

Vegard Skirbekk, Marcin Stonawski, Guido Alfani
sikk2

The demographic transition, i.e., the passage from the ancient to the modern demographic regime of low fertility and low mortality, can be a highly heterogeneous process, and its impact on population growth can differ widely.
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Deaths exceed births in most of Europe, but not in the United States, and not in Texas
Plus de décès que de naissances dans la plupart de l’Europe, mais pas aux États-Unis, et pas au Texas

Dudley L. Poston jr., Kenneth M. Johnson, Layton Field
a crowd of painted people

Prevalence of natural decrease. In the first decade of the 21st century (2000-2009), 58 percent of the 1,391 counties of Europe had more deaths than births
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The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development
L’agenda des Nations Unies pour le développement durable

Massimo livi Bacci
global coals U N

The United Nations Sustainable Development Summit was held in New York on 25-27 September 2015. The 193-member UN General Assembly formally adopted the ambitious agenda “Transforming Our World: 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”
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