Tag Archives: Fertility

The Icelandic Saga. Fertility in the midst of delayed family formation
Islande : une fécondité élevée malgré le recul de l’âge à la maternité

Ari Klængur Jónsson
Iceland city reikiavik

In European demography, Iceland has been an outlier until recently, with a fertility rate well above that of most countries on the continent. Between 1982 and 2014, the Icelandic total period fertility rate (TFR) ranged between 1.9 and 2.3 children per woman (Figure 1).
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Fertility in the time of economic crisis
La fécondité aux temps de la crise économique

Ludovica Comolli
Fertility in the time of economic crisis - empty cradles

When uncertain about the stability of their present or future earnings or jobs, individuals postpone life-changing decisions. Scientific research confirms conventional wisdom and shows that the Great Recession that started in 2008 had a paralyzing effect on childbearing in most western economies. As illustrated in Figure 1, after a period of growing fertility at the
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Persistent high fertility in rural Africa
Persistance d’une fécondité élevée en milieu rural africain

Michel Garenne
fertility in rural Africa: group of boys

The fertility transition, defined as a change from high and natural fertility (in a range of five to nine children per woman) to low and controlled fertility (down to two children per woman or less) started in France in the 18th century, and spread during the 19th century to other European populations, including expatriate populations
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Surrogacy: a multi-faceted phenomenon
La gestation pour autrui: une réalité complexe et plurielle

Virginie Rozée, Laurent Toulemon
surrogacy: pregnent woman

Although still rare among assisted reproductive technologies (ART)¹, surrogacy is a very controversial subject: some consider it as a new way to overcome infertility,
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Family planning in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya
Planning familial dans les bidonvilles de Nairobi, Kenya

Donatien Beguy, Alex C. Ezeh, Blessing U. Mberu, Jacques B.O. Emina
children in Nairobi

In Kenya, rapid population growth has occurred amidst poor urban governance and limited employment opportunities, leading to widespread urban poverty that is concentrated in informal settlements or slums.
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Recent fertility changes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Évolution récente de la fécondité en République démocratique du Congo

David Shapiro, Basile O. Tambashe
Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the third most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of the countries with the highest fertility in the world, at 6.6 children per woman in the country’s most recent Demographic and Health Survey (MPSMRM et al 2014). It is also one of the very few countries
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Past fertility and living alone in later life in Spain
La fécondité et le risque de vivre seule au grand âge en Espagne

David S. Reher, Miguel Requena
woman in later life in Spain

The prevalence of living alone during later life varies widely across developed countries but everywhere its recent growth has been remarkable, even in societies with traditionally strong family ties. Fertility has been very low in these countries for decades now, especially in the eastern and southern fringes of Europe, and there are simultaneous increases in
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First birth postponement and fertility in Europe
Report des premières naissances et fécondité en Europe

Hippolyte d’Albis, Angela Greulich, Gregory Ponthière
niussp_motherhood_articolo

The postponement of first childbirth has been occurring in most European countries for some decades now. In public and media discussion, delayed childbearing is often rather glibly associated with the fact that more women are going to university and getting jobs, and that they consequently want fewer children. Researchers find that for women born in
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Will international adoption be replaced by surrogacy?
La gestation pour autrui va-t-elle remplacer l’adoption internationale?

Jean-François Mignot
Juno_niussp2

Until the 1960s and 1970s, infecund (sterile) Western couples who desired a child but could not have one of their own could usually adopt a child in their home country. However, as contraception developed and induced abortion became legal in the West, fewer and fewer children were unwanted and abandoned by their birth parents and
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Are population policies effective?
Les politiques démographiques sont-elles efficaces ?

Jacques Vallin
vallin

Let us look at four types of objective that can legitimize population policies in a given context: reducing mortality (Vallin et Meslé, 2006), limiting fertility if the population is growing too quickly (Locoh et Vandermersch, 2006), or encouraging it if the opposite is true (De Santis, 2006), and controlling migration (Baldi et Cagiano de Azevedo,
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How women in South Korea juggle work and family life
La difficile conciliation entre travail et vie familiale en Corée

Li Ma
LiMa2

Employment and childbearing are important stages in a woman’s life course. Their relationship is influenced not only by individual characteristics, but also by the socio-economic and institutional context. Availability of childcare services, flexible working hours, and paid leave with job protection after childbirth
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Fertility in Western Europe: the role of religion
Religiosité et fécondité en Europe occidentale

Nitzan Peri-Rotem
Niussp_23_maggio2

The religious landscape in Western Europe is characterised by contrasting trends; while attendance rates at religious services have declined dramatically, over half of the population in this region still identify themselves as affiliated with a particular religion (Voas 2009). What is the relevance of religion to individual behaviour in these so-called secularised countries? More specifically,
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Son preference as a new twist in China’s low fertility
La préférence pour les fils et la faible fécondité en Chine

Quanbao Jiang, Ying Li, Jesús J. Sánchez-Barricarte
China

China is now facing the challenge of low fertility. Its total fertility rate first fell below replacement level in the early 1990s, and had dropped to only 1.18 children per woman by 2010 (or, possibly, 1.5, taking account of possible underreporting; Cai, 2013). Among the drivers of fertility decline, birth control policy is considered by
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Adolescent fertility in Latin America and the Caribbean
La fécondité des adolescentes en Amérique latine et dans les Antilles

Jorge Rodriguez Vignoli
Vignoli

Up until the 1970s, the Latin American and Caribbean region stood out for its high levels of fertility. Decline was rapid in subsequent years, but adolescent fertility in the region is still a concern: it is the second highest in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa (Figure 1). According to the latest censuses and surveys, approximately
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Fertility transition in India: sub-regional evidence
La transition de la fécondité dans les districts indiens

Sanjay K. Mohanty, Günther Fink, Rajesh K. Chauhan, David Canning
Fertility

Population stabilization in India is of obvious global significance. According to the latest census, India’s population was 1,210 million in 2011, accounting for 17 percent of the global population; if current trends continue, India will become the world’s most populous country in 2022.
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Lower world population growth? A matter of culture
Une moindre croissance démographique mondiale? Une question de culture

Vegard Skirbekk, Marcin Stonawski, Guido Alfani
sikk2

The demographic transition, i.e., the passage from the ancient to the modern demographic regime of low fertility and low mortality, can be a highly heterogeneous process, and its impact on population growth can differ widely.
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Is there a gender bias in births and child mortality in Indonesia ?
Peut-on parler de discrimination sexuelle en Indonésie?

Christophe Z. Guilmoto
children indonesia

Son preference and gender bias, which are revealed in births and child mortality, tend to be concentrated in South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Europe, and the South Caucasus—places where patrilineal and patrilocal family systems prevail.
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Surprenante fécondité maghrébine
The puzzle of fertility in the Maghreb

Zahia Ouadah-Bedidi, Jacques Vallin
children plaing in magreb

Au début des années 1970, la fécondité restait très élevée en Tunisie et au Maroc (6,5 enfants par femme) malgré les programmes de planning familial mis en œuvre au milieu des années 1960 et culminait même à plus de 8 en Algérie en raison du baby-boom qui a suivi la guerre de libération. Personne n’imaginait
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Des projections démographiques jusqu’en 2100… Est-ce bien raisonnable?
Demographic projections up to 2100 … Do they make sense?

Henri Leridon
arrow made with people

En économie, il est rare que l’on se hasarde à des prévisions au-delà de quelques années. Il n’y a guère que les climatologues pour faire tourner des modèles sur 100 ans
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Les politiques démographiques sont-elles efficaces ?
On the dubious effectiveness of population policies

Jacques Vallin
an old couple

Examinons quatre types d’objectifs pouvant légitimer des politiques de population dans un contexte donné : réduire la mortalité (Vallin et Meslé, 2006), limiter la fécondité si la croissance démographique est trop rapide
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