Tag Archives: Women

Poverty is falling faster for female-headed households in Africa
En Afrique, la pauvreté diminue plus rapidement pour les ménages dirigés par une femme

Dominique van de Walle, Annamaria Milazzo
woman households in Africa

Living standards have risen generally, and poverty rates have fallen across Sub-Saharan Africa since the late 1990s (Chen and Ravallion, 2013). Less is known about how different groups have fared.
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Unstable union history linked to higher childhood mortality risk
Instabilité conjugale des mères et mortalité des enfants dans le Sud

Laurie F. DeRose
childhood mortality risk : woman with newborn

The marriage-go-round can be a costly ride for children in post-industrial countries as family instability is associated with elevated risk of negative outcomes like teen pregnancy, depression, aggression, asthma, and obesity.
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Children born to a lone mother and their well-being in the UK
Le bien-être des enfants de mères célibataires au Royaume-Uni

Elena Mariani, Alice Goisis
lone mother with his children

Numerous studies have looked at the relationship between family structure and child well-being. Overall, the evidence suggests that children who grow up in a household with two married biological parents, on average, do better than those growing up with a single mother (Bernardi and Boertien 2017; Sigle-Rushton and McLanahan 2014; McLanahan et al. 2013). However,
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Sharing routine housework and desire for more children in East Asia
Le partage des tâches ménagères et le désir d’enfants en Asie de l’Est

Man-Yee Kan, Ekaterina Hertog
woman doing routine housework

Low fertility levels have become a typical characteristic of industrialised countries where two distinct patterns are observed. A number of countries, especially in southern Europe and East Asia, have persistently low fertility levels. Another group of countries, such as Sweden and Finland, after a period of fluctuation, have managed to achieve fertility close to replacement
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Surrogacy: a multi-faceted phenomenon
La gestation pour autrui: une réalité complexe et plurielle

Virginie Rozée, Laurent Toulemon
surrogacy: pregnent woman

Although still rare among assisted reproductive technologies (ART)¹, surrogacy is a very controversial subject: some consider it as a new way to overcome infertility,
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Family planning in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya
Planning familial dans les bidonvilles de Nairobi, Kenya

Donatien Beguy, Alex C. Ezeh, Blessing U. Mberu, Jacques B.O. Emina
children in Nairobi

In Kenya, rapid population growth has occurred amidst poor urban governance and limited employment opportunities, leading to widespread urban poverty that is concentrated in informal settlements or slums.
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Will international adoption be replaced by surrogacy?
La gestation pour autrui va-t-elle remplacer l’adoption internationale?

Jean-François Mignot
Juno_niussp2

Until the 1960s and 1970s, infecund (sterile) Western couples who desired a child but could not have one of their own could usually adopt a child in their home country. However, as contraception developed and induced abortion became legal in the West, fewer and fewer children were unwanted and abandoned by their birth parents and
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Marriage then the baby carriage?
Mariage et fécondité dans les pays développés d’aujourd’hui

Jennifer A. Holland
Niussp_marriage2

The mid-20th-century was a Golden Age of marriage in Europe and the United States. People married early, usually in their early-to-mid-20s, and often, with over 90% of people marrying at least once in most countries (Sobotka & Toulemon 2008). Fast forward to the early 21st century: fewer people marry and those who do wait longer,
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Eradicating induced abortion? Lessons from 20th Century France
Empêcher l’avortement? L’histoire française du XXe siècle

Fabrice Cahen
avortement

In France, for two decades – roughly from the late 1930s to the late 1950s – induced abortion was not only prohibited, it was well and truly the target of a war (Cahen, 2016). What can 21st century citizens learn from this historical episode? From moral rejection to public policies The moral perception of induced
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Assimilation and birth outcomes of Hispanics in the US
Mariages mixtes et issue des grossesses des Hispaniques aux États Unis

Osea Giuntella
Hispanic2

The immigrant health effect is a well-known public health fact observed in many advanced economies. Immigrants tend to be healthier than natives, though their health advantage erodes over time.
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The geography of female-breadwinner and equal-income couples in Europe
La géographie européenne des couples où la femme gagne autant ou plus que l’homme

Agnese Vitali, Bruno Arpino
breadwinner2

An increasing number of couples today are dependent upon women’s labour income. Along with an increase in dual-earner couples, couples where the woman out-earns her partner are also on the rise in Europe (Vitali and Mendola 2014).
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Beyond mothers who father: the study of female headship
Au-delà des pères absents: les ménages où le chef de famille est une femme

Chia Liu
motherswhofothers2

More than half of a century has passed since Edith Clark first wrote “My Mother Who Fathered Me” in 1957, a classic study on single motherhood (marriage, sex, and concubinage) in Jamaica at the time. The Caribbean, along with Latin America, continue to experience high levels of non-marital childbearing today.
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Adolescent fertility in Latin America and the Caribbean
La fécondité des adolescentes en Amérique latine et dans les Antilles

Jorge Rodriguez Vignoli
Vignoli

Up until the 1970s, the Latin American and Caribbean region stood out for its high levels of fertility. Decline was rapid in subsequent years, but adolescent fertility in the region is still a concern: it is the second highest in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa (Figure 1). According to the latest censuses and surveys, approximately
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Smoking in Italy since World War II
Fumer en Italie, depuis 1950

Carl Ipsen
CP7_Edelweiss

Smoking has obviously and significantly impacted human mortality. And while the death toll from smoking may be its most striking legacy, the study of smoking also reveals aspects of social, cultural, economic and political history, all areas that I explore in my monograph on the history of smoking in Italy in the nineteenth and twentieth
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Is there a gender bias in births and child mortality in Indonesia ?
Peut-on parler de discrimination sexuelle en Indonésie?

Christophe Z. Guilmoto
children indonesia

Son preference and gender bias, which are revealed in births and child mortality, tend to be concentrated in South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Europe, and the South Caucasus—places where patrilineal and patrilocal family systems prevail.
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If American women have it so bad, why should India’s women not “not join” the labor force?
Pour les Indiennes comme pour les Américaines, intégrer le marché du travail n’est pas aussi facile qu’on le décrit.

Alaka Basu
indian woman working around a table

If there is one gender issue that has mainstream America rightly roiled up today, it has to do with women and work, or more specifically, women at work.
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Allez les filles, au travail!

Valeria Solesin
Valeria Solesin

Version française en bas. Two years ago, Neodemos received an article from Valeria SOLESIN, a young student who was then unknown to most demographers, in Italy or elsewhere. She was later to make herself known, both in Italy and in France, where she had in the meantime become a PhD student. Her life ended tragically
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