archive 2017 2016 2015

Are U.S. whites ‘hunkering down’ in racially-diverse cities and neighborhoods?
Les blancs américains préfèrent-ils le “vivre entre soi” ?

Daniel T. Lichter, Domenico Parisi, Michael C. Taquino
U.S.A. white and black people

America’s new racial diversity has upended conventional empirical approaches to residential segregation based on simple binary notions of the color line: white–black, white–nonwhite, or black–nonblack. Multiculturalism, pluralism, and racial hierarchy are now expressed in the new language of majority-minority, super diversity (i.e., heightened diversity within minority or immigrant populations), and global neighborhoods (i.e., those with
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Migration reduces climate risk for many but not for all
La migration réduit le risque climatique (mais pas pour tous)

Martina Grecequet, Jessica Hellmann
City desert: migration reduces climate risk

As the consequences of climate change accumulate, many experts expect to see migration away from the world’s most impacted regions as people seek a climate and an economy that better sustains human life. This will add to migratory movements caused by other more traditional reasons: civil wars, natural disasters or the search for better work
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Immigrant receptivity and local area unemployment in the U.S.
Chômage et perception des immigrés à l’échelle locale aux États-Unis

Gordon F. De Jong, Deborah R. Graefe, Chris Galvan, Stephanie Howe Hasanali
Niussp_chomage3

Recent political events in many countries have made it clear that the receptivity of immigrants by destination area citizens is a contentious issue. Natives in arrival countries have demonstrated both hostile and welcoming attitudes and behavior, ranging from anti-immigrant attacks and votes in elections, to spontaneous and organized food and housing support for immigrants. Cross-national
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Children born to a lone mother and their well-being in the UK
Le bien-être des enfants de mères célibataires au Royaume-Uni

Elena Mariani, Alice Goisis
lone mother with his children

Numerous studies have looked at the relationship between family structure and child well-being. Overall, the evidence suggests that children who grow up in a household with two married biological parents, on average, do better than those growing up with a single mother (Bernardi and Boertien 2017; Sigle-Rushton and McLanahan 2014; McLanahan et al. 2013). However,
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Sharing routine housework and desire for more children in East Asia
Le partage des tâches ménagères et le désir d’enfants en Asie de l’Est

Man-Yee Kan, Ekaterina Hertog
woman doing routine housework

Low fertility levels have become a typical characteristic of industrialised countries where two distinct patterns are observed. A number of countries, especially in southern Europe and East Asia, have persistently low fertility levels. Another group of countries, such as Sweden and Finland, after a period of fluctuation, have managed to achieve fertility close to replacement
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Fertility in the time of economic crisis
La fécondité aux temps de la crise économique

Ludovica Comolli
Fertility in the time of economic crisis - empty cradles

When uncertain about the stability of their present or future earnings or jobs, individuals postpone life-changing decisions. Scientific research confirms conventional wisdom and shows that the Great Recession that started in 2008 had a paralyzing effect on childbearing in most western economies. As illustrated in Figure 1, after a period of growing fertility at the
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Persistent high fertility in rural Africa
Persistance d’une fécondité élevée en milieu rural africain

Michel Garenne
fertility in rural Africa: group of boys

The fertility transition, defined as a change from high and natural fertility (in a range of five to nine children per woman) to low and controlled fertility (down to two children per woman or less) started in France in the 18th century, and spread during the 19th century to other European populations, including expatriate populations
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Majority to minority: the declining U.S. white population
Quand la majorité devient minorité : le cas des blancs aux Etats-Unis

Dudley L. Poston jr., Rogelio Sáenz
minority. two young black boys in new york

In this essay we document the demography of the decline of the white population in the United States, a country with a long history of white supremacy.
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Internal migration drives population change in Asia
Migration interne et changement démographique en Asie

Gavin Jones
internal migration, picture o people walkingpeople walking

The three giants of Asia – China, India and Indonesia – make up 40% of the world’s population and 49% of the population of countries defined by the United Nations as developing.  
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Surrogacy: a multi-faceted phenomenon
La gestation pour autrui: une réalité complexe et plurielle

Virginie Rozée, Laurent Toulemon
surrogacy: pregnent woman

Although still rare among assisted reproductive technologies (ART)¹, surrogacy is a very controversial subject: some consider it as a new way to overcome infertility,
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The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion
Quatre milliards de personnes en plus. Mais différentes

David Lam
image of people. next 4 billion people

When the world population reached 7 billion in 2011, it marked the amazing addition of 4 billion people in just over 50 years, the world having attained the 3 billion milestone in 1960.
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Family planning in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya
Planning familial dans les bidonvilles de Nairobi, Kenya

Donatien Beguy, Alex C. Ezeh, Blessing U. Mberu, Jacques B.O. Emina
children in Nairobi

In Kenya, rapid population growth has occurred amidst poor urban governance and limited employment opportunities, leading to widespread urban poverty that is concentrated in informal settlements or slums.
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The rise of divorce, separation, and cohabitation in the Philippines
La montée des divorces, séparations et cohabitations aux Philippines

Jeofrey B. Abalos
Philippines rise of divorce

“What God has put together let no man put asunder”. This biblical quote is frequently heard among Filipinos, particularly among the older generations, to discourage young people from leaving an unsatisfactory marriage.
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Recent trends in premarital fertility in sub-Saharan Africa
Évolution récente de la fécondité prénuptiale en Afrique sub-saharienne

Shelley Clark, Alissa Koski, Emily Smith-Greenaway
children: premarital fertility

Age at first marriage has been rising throughout sub-Saharan Africa for more than twenty-five years. The median age at first marriage has increased by an average of 1-2 years across the region but substantial variation in age at first marriage remains (Garenne 2004).
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Think race and ethnicity are permanent? Think again
Surprise! Race et appartenance ethnique changent au fil du temps

Carolyn A. Liebler, Sonya R. Porter, Leticia E. Fernandez, James M. Noon, Sharon R. Ennis
picture showing people of different race and ethnicity

Add something else to the list of things that seem simple but are actually complicated – the way someone reports their race or ethnicity. In a recently-published research article (Liebler et al. 2017), we used a large, unique linked dataset from two U.S. Censuses
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Marriage is useless (for wages)
Se marier est inutile (pour gagner plus)

Alexandra Killewald, Ian Lundberg
marriage is useless for wages: rings and money

On average, in the United States, men earn more per hour when married than when single, even after adjusting for differences such as age and education. However, despite the suggestive evidence that marriage may exert a causal effect on men’s wages, we argue that closer inspection reveals little evidence of such a link. Why might
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Recent fertility changes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Évolution récente de la fécondité en République démocratique du Congo

David Shapiro, Basile O. Tambashe
Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the third most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of the countries with the highest fertility in the world, at 6.6 children per woman in the country’s most recent Demographic and Health Survey (MPSMRM et al 2014). It is also one of the very few countries
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ISIS genocide of the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar, Iraq
Le génocide par Daech de la minorité religieuse Yazidi de Sinjar, en Irak

Valeria Cetorelli, Isaac Sasson, Nazar Shabila, Gilbert Burnham
profughi_art

A UN Independent International Commission of Inquiry has determined that ISIS acts against the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar constitute a case of ongoing genocide (OHCR 2016).
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Non-cohabiting relationships: mainly a transitional situation
Le couple à distance: une situation avant tout transitoire

Arnaud Régnier-Loilier
articolo_art

Formerly synonymous with marriage, cohabitation has become a lasting form of union in France and this country is now among those where the practice is most widespread (Prioux 2009).
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Population density interacts with sanitation to predict child health
Densité de population, équipements sanitaires et santé des enfants

Diane Coffey, Payal Hathi
Population density: child in India

Studies on child health in developing countries often find that children are healthier in urban areas than in rural areas. There are many reasons for this disparity. People in urban areas tend to be richer and better educated. Further, more densely populated places are more likely to have easier access to health services that matter
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