archive 2017 2016 2015

The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion
Quatre milliards de personnes en plus. Mais différentes

David Lam
image of people. next 4 billion people

When the world population reached 7 billion in 2011, it marked the amazing addition of 4 billion people in just over 50 years, the world having attained the 3 billion milestone in 1960.
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Family planning in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya
Planning familial dans les bidonvilles de Nairobi, Kenya

Donatien Beguy, Alex C. Ezeh, Blessing U. Mberu, Jacques B.O. Emina
children in Nairobi

In Kenya, rapid population growth has occurred amidst poor urban governance and limited employment opportunities, leading to widespread urban poverty that is concentrated in informal settlements or slums.
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The rise of divorce, separation, and cohabitation in the Philippines
La montée des divorces, séparations et cohabitations aux Philippines

Jeofrey B. Abalos
Philippines rise of divorce

“What God has put together let no man put asunder”. This biblical quote is frequently heard among Filipinos, particularly among the older generations, to discourage young people from leaving an unsatisfactory marriage.
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Recent trends in premarital fertility in sub-Saharan Africa
Évolution récente de la fécondité prénuptiale en Afrique sub-saharienne

Shelley Clark, Alissa Koski, Emily Smith-Greenaway
children: premarital fertility

Age at first marriage has been rising throughout sub-Saharan Africa for more than twenty-five years. The median age at first marriage has increased by an average of 1-2 years across the region but substantial variation in age at first marriage remains (Garenne 2004).
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Think race and ethnicity are permanent? Think again
Surprise! Race et appartenance ethnique changent au fil du temps

Carolyn A. Liebler, Sonya R. Porter, Leticia E. Fernandez, James M. Noon, Sharon R. Ennis
picture showing people of different race and ethnicity

Add something else to the list of things that seem simple but are actually complicated – the way someone reports their race or ethnicity. In a recently-published research article (Liebler et al. 2017), we used a large, unique linked dataset from two U.S. Censuses
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Marriage is useless (for wages)
Se marier est inutile (pour gagner plus)

Alexandra Killewald, Ian Lundberg
marriage is useless for wages: rings and money

On average, in the United States, men earn more per hour when married than when single, even after adjusting for differences such as age and education. However, despite the suggestive evidence that marriage may exert a causal effect on men’s wages, we argue that closer inspection reveals little evidence of such a link. Why might
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Recent fertility changes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Évolution récente de la fécondité en République démocratique du Congo

David Shapiro, Basile O. Tambashe
Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the third most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of the countries with the highest fertility in the world, at 6.6 children per woman in the country’s most recent Demographic and Health Survey (MPSMRM et al 2014). It is also one of the very few countries
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ISIS genocide of the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar, Iraq
Le génocide par Daech de la minorité religieuse Yazidi de Sinjar, en Irak

Valeria Cetorelli, Isaac Sasson, Nazar Shabila, Gilbert Burnham
profughi_art

A UN Independent International Commission of Inquiry has determined that ISIS acts against the Yazidi religious minority of Sinjar constitute a case of ongoing genocide (OHCR 2016).
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Non-cohabiting relationships: mainly a transitional situation
Le couple à distance: une situation avant tout transitoire

Arnaud Régnier-Loilier
articolo_art

Formerly synonymous with marriage, cohabitation has become a lasting form of union in France and this country is now among those where the practice is most widespread (Prioux 2009).
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Population density interacts with sanitation to predict child health
Densité de population, équipements sanitaires et santé des enfants

Diane Coffey, Payal Hathi
Population density: child in India

Studies on child health in developing countries often find that children are healthier in urban areas than in rural areas. There are many reasons for this disparity. People in urban areas tend to be richer and better educated. Further, more densely populated places are more likely to have easier access to health services that matter
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Teenage immigrants fare worse than younger immigrants in Norway
Les migrants adolescents réussissent moins bien que les migrants plus jeunes en Norvège

Are Skeie Hermansen
Noeway_art

Immigration during childhood represents an important turning point for future developmental trajectories, and the timing of this event (i.e., age at arrival) has an impact on later-life educational success and economic opportunities (Hermansen, 2017). About 15 percent of the world’s migrants are under the age of 20. That is almost 37 million people according to
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Past fertility and living alone in later life in Spain
La fécondité et le risque de vivre seule au grand âge en Espagne

David S. Reher, Miguel Requena
woman in later life in Spain

The prevalence of living alone during later life varies widely across developed countries but everywhere its recent growth has been remarkable, even in societies with traditionally strong family ties. Fertility has been very low in these countries for decades now, especially in the eastern and southern fringes of Europe, and there are simultaneous increases in
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Increasing residential age segregation in Britain
Augmentation de la ségrégation résidentielle selon l’âge en Grande-Bretagne

Albert Sabater, Elspeth Graham, Nissa Finney
residential age segregation

The age differentiation of neighbourhoods is often viewed as natural, inevitable or unproblematic, with the view of particular places as appropriate for some age groups while others are not. Increases over the past century in the “chronolization” of life – the use of age to determine what activities and spaces individuals will engage or live
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First birth postponement and fertility in Europe
Report des premières naissances et fécondité en Europe

Hippolyte d’Albis, Angela Greulich, Gregory Ponthière
niussp_motherhood_articolo

The postponement of first childbirth has been occurring in most European countries for some decades now. In public and media discussion, delayed childbearing is often rather glibly associated with the fact that more women are going to university and getting jobs, and that they consequently want fewer children. Researchers find that for women born in
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How comparable are self-reported health data on the older population in Europe?
L’état de santé perçu des personnes âgées en Europe. Les données sont-elles comparables ?

Katherine Keenan, Else Foverskov, Emily Grundy
Niussp_oggi3

Europe has large projected increases in the proportion of older people in the population (United Nations 2013). Therefore, high quality, representative longitudinal data on the older European population are essential to develop our understanding of age-related changes in socio-demographic circumstances, health, resources and activity patterns. The SHARE and GGS surveys Two notable sources of large
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The demography of Trump’s wall
Le mur de Trump et ses conséquences démographiques

Dudley L. Poston jr., Peter A. Morrison
Schermata-2017-03-30-alle-15.58.50

A major feature of the presidential campaign of Donald Trump was his pledge to build a wall on the southern border of the United States that would stop once and forever the “illegal” migration of Mexicans and others from Central America. He told his supporters that Mexico would pay for the wall. But he has
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The economic and fiscal impact of immigration in the US
L’impact économique et fiscal de l’immigration aux États-Unis

Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie
ImmigrationUsa_niussp

More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, immigrants and their children comprise almost one in four Americans. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts
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Will international adoption be replaced by surrogacy?
La gestation pour autrui va-t-elle remplacer l’adoption internationale?

Jean-François Mignot
Juno_niussp2

Until the 1960s and 1970s, infecund (sterile) Western couples who desired a child but could not have one of their own could usually adopt a child in their home country. However, as contraception developed and induced abortion became legal in the West, fewer and fewer children were unwanted and abandoned by their birth parents and
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Does birth spacing matter for long-term outcomes?
Intervalles intergénésiques: quelles conséquences sur le devenir des enfants?

Kieron Barclay
niussp_13marzo2

In a study recently published in the journal Demography, my co-author Martin Kolk and I examined whether the length of spacing between births is related to long-term cognitive, educational, and socioeconomic outcomes (Open Access paper available here).
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Marriage then the baby carriage?
Mariage et fécondité dans les pays développés d’aujourd’hui

Jennifer A. Holland
Niussp_marriage2

The mid-20th-century was a Golden Age of marriage in Europe and the United States. People married early, usually in their early-to-mid-20s, and often, with over 90% of people marrying at least once in most countries (Sobotka & Toulemon 2008). Fast forward to the early 21st century: fewer people marry and those who do wait longer,
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