Tag Archives: Demography

The Icelandic Saga. Fertility in the midst of delayed family formation
Islande : une fécondité élevée malgré le recul de l’âge à la maternité

Ari Klængur Jónsson
Iceland city reikiavik

In European demography, Iceland has been an outlier until recently, with a fertility rate well above that of most countries on the continent. Between 1982 and 2014, the Icelandic total period fertility rate (TFR) ranged between 1.9 and 2.3 children per woman (Figure 1).
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Migration reduces climate risk for many but not for all
La migration réduit le risque climatique (mais pas pour tous)

Martina Grecequet, Jessica Hellmann
City desert: migration reduces climate risk

As the consequences of climate change accumulate, many experts expect to see migration away from the world’s most impacted regions as people seek a climate and an economy that better sustains human life. This will add to migratory movements caused by other more traditional reasons:
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Internal migration drives population change in Asia
Migration interne et changement démographique en Asie

Gavin Jones
internal migration, picture o people walkingpeople walking

The three giants of Asia – China, India and Indonesia – make up 40% of the world’s population and 49% of the population of countries defined by the United Nations as developing.  
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Surrogacy: a multi-faceted phenomenon
La gestation pour autrui: une réalité complexe et plurielle

Virginie Rozée, Laurent Toulemon
surrogacy: pregnent woman

Although still rare among assisted reproductive technologies (ART)¹, surrogacy is a very controversial subject: some consider it as a new way to overcome infertility,
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The world’s next 4 billion people will differ from the previous 4 billion
Quatre milliards de personnes en plus. Mais différentes

David Lam
image of people. next 4 billion people

When the world population reached 7 billion in 2011, it marked the amazing addition of 4 billion people in just over 50 years, the world having attained the 3 billion milestone in 1960.
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Recent fertility changes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Évolution récente de la fécondité en République démocratique du Congo

David Shapiro, Basile O. Tambashe
Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the third most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of the countries with the highest fertility in the world, at 6.6 children per woman in the country’s most recent Demographic and Health Survey (MPSMRM et al 2014). It is also one of the very few countries
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The demography of Trump’s wall
Le mur de Trump et ses conséquences démographiques

Dudley L. Poston jr., Peter A. Morrison
Schermata-2017-03-30-alle-15.58.50

A major feature of the presidential campaign of Donald Trump was his pledge to build a wall on the southern border of the United States that would stop once and forever the “illegal” migration of Mexicans and others from Central America. He told his supporters that Mexico would pay for the wall. But he has
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Will international adoption be replaced by surrogacy?
La gestation pour autrui va-t-elle remplacer l’adoption internationale?

Jean-François Mignot
Juno_niussp2

Until the 1960s and 1970s, infecund (sterile) Western couples who desired a child but could not have one of their own could usually adopt a child in their home country. However, as contraception developed and induced abortion became legal in the West, fewer and fewer children were unwanted and abandoned by their birth parents and
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Does birth spacing matter for long-term outcomes?
Intervalles intergénésiques: quelles conséquences sur le devenir des enfants?

Kieron Barclay
niussp_13marzo2

In a study recently published in the journal Demography, my co-author Martin Kolk and I examined whether the length of spacing between births is related to long-term cognitive, educational, and socioeconomic outcomes (Open Access paper available here).
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Vital registration in Africa: when will it be complete?
À quand un état civil exhaustif en Afrique?

Michel Garenne, Pierre Cantrelle
VItalregistration2

Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CR/VS) is an essential administrative system in modern societies. The registration of births and deaths defines a number of basic rights and duties, and is compulsory for the rule of law, legal identity, social security systems and many other aspects of social life. The publication and analysis of vital statistics
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International differences in life expectancy gains (and in their cost)
Vivre plus longtemps (et le prix à payer) dans 14 pays développés

Nick Parr, Jackie Li, Leonie Tickle
life expectancy - old people walking

Ongoing increases in life expectancies may slow the growth of living standards in developed countries. One reason for this is that reductions in mortality rates, which these days are generally greater in the older ages
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In France, male managers live six years longer than male manual workers
En France, un cadre vit six ans de plus qu’un ouvrier

Nathalie Blanpain
malemanager2

We all die one day, but we are not all equal in this respect, because death tends to strike at different ages. Take men and women, for instance: in France, under the mortality conditions of 2009-2013,
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Strong growth projected for Australia’s Indigenous population
Projections de forte croissance de la population autochtone australienne

Tom Wilson
niussp_2017_2

Australia’s Indigenous population Australia’s Indigenous population consists of its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Aboriginal peoples are estimated to have settled the Australian continent approximately 50,000 years ago
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Demographic dividend in Africa: macro- and micro-economic effects
Dividende démographique en Afrique: effets économiques macro et micro

Michel Garenne
garenne

A fashionable but controversial concept The ‘demographic dividend’ has become a fashionable concept over the past 20 years, and was the focus of the recent UAPS conference held in South Africa in December 2015.
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Loneliness among seniors in Europe. Far higher risk in the East
La solitude des seniors en Europe : un risque bien plus élevé à l’Est

Thomas Hansen, Britt Slagsvold
LONLEY OLD MAN

Loneliness is widely perceived as a problem of old age, as part of “normal” aging. Research shows, however, that only 5 to 15% of adults aged 60–80 report frequent feelings of loneliness (Dykstra 2009). Yet this literature is based primarily on data from Western countries with advanced welfare systems.
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The drivers of children’s outcomes in Australia
Les déterminants du devenir des enfants en Australie

Rasheda Khanam
Niussp25_luglio2016_2

Childhood has gained renewed attention from academics, researchers and policy makers, as evidence shows that this stage of life deeply affects future educational achievements and labour market success (Blanden, Gregg and Macmillan 2007).
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The Merry-go-round of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals
Le manège autour des Objectifs de développement durable des Nations Unies

Alaka Basu
young woman of a country in developement

Advocacy is a funny thing. If you feel strongly enough about a cause, as everyone in international development does these days, it is no longer enough to campaign for something simply for its own sake.
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The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development
L’agenda des Nations Unies pour le développement durable

Massimo livi Bacci
global coals U N

The United Nations Sustainable Development Summit was held in New York on 25-27 September 2015. The 193-member UN General Assembly formally adopted the ambitious agenda “Transforming Our World: 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”
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Surprenante fécondité maghrébine
The puzzle of fertility in the Maghreb

Zahia Ouadah-Bedidi, Jacques Vallin
children plaing in magreb

Au début des années 1970, la fécondité restait très élevée en Tunisie et au Maroc (6,5 enfants par femme) malgré les programmes de planning familial mis en œuvre au milieu des années 1960 et culminait même à plus de 8 en Algérie en raison du baby-boom qui a suivi la guerre de libération. Personne n’imaginait
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Des projections démographiques jusqu’en 2100… Est-ce bien raisonnable?
Demographic projections up to 2100 … Do they make sense?

Henri Leridon
arrow made with people

En économie, il est rare que l’on se hasarde à des prévisions au-delà de quelques années. Il n’y a guère que les climatologues pour faire tourner des modèles sur 100 ans
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